10/21/08 ~ Dr. Wendy Satin Rapaport, Clinical Psychologist

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will interview Dr. Wendy Satin Rapaport, Clinical Psychologist. Dr. Rapaport is the author of When Diabetes Hits Home; the Whole Family’s Guide to Living Well With Diabetes

Dr. Wendy Satin Rapaport, L.S.C.W., Psy. D.

Wendy Satin Rapaport, L.S.C.W., Psy.D., is Adjunct Professor of Medicine and Psychology at the Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami, and has specialized in individual, marital, family and group therapy for patients with diabetes for more than 20 years. A professional writer, Dr. Rapaport has published more than 30 articles on this subject, and frequently lectures around the country. In 1999, she was awarded the National Health Information Award for her book, When Diabetes Hits Home: The Whole Family’s Guide to Emotional Health. In her book she addresses the challenges facing people with diabetes, both those who are newly diagnosed and those who have lived with diabetes for many years, as well as strategies for the management of diabetes through actions and attitudes for everyone involved.

For more information on Dr. Wendy Satin Rapaport click here.

Photo Above: Dr. Wendy Satin Rapaport

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® interview:

10/21/08 ~ Dr. Wendy Satin Rapaport, Clinical Psychologist

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9/23/08 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added™ Open Forum, The ABC’s of Diabetes

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will have an Open Forum. They will be taking your phone calls and answering your questions on Diabetes. Listener’s are invited to call in with their questions and comments. 

Photo Above: Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. & Kitty Castellini

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®:

9/23/08 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added™ Open Forum, The ABC’s of Diabetes

9/16/08 ~ Diabetic Gastroparesis with Dr. Jay Malamut, Gastroenterology

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will interview Dr. Jay Malamut, Gastroenterology. Listener’s are invited to call in with their questions and comments.

Jay Malamut, MD

Dr Malamut graduated from Lafayette College with a BA in Biology with Honors. He earned his MD degree at Hahnemann University and also completed his internship, residency in Internal Medicine and Fellowship in Gastroenterology at Hahnemann. Dr. Malamut has also earned a Masters Degree in Medical Management from the Department of Health Systems Management in the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at Tulane University.

Dr Malamut has been in the private practice of Gastroenterology in Voorhees, NJ since 1986. He is on the staff of Virtua Hospital and also serves as the Chairman of the Board of Centennial Surgery Center in Voorhees. He has held previous positions as Clinical Instructor at Hahnemann University and as Chief of the Section of Gastroenterology at Virtua Health.

Photo Above: Dr. Jay Malamut

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® interview:

9/16/08 ~ Diabetic Gastroparesis with Dr. Jay Malamut, Gastroenterology

10/14/08 ~ Dr. Scott Schaffer, ENT

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will interview Dr. Scott Schaffer, ENT. Listener’s are invited to call in with their questions and comments.

Preventing Ear, Nose and Throat Problems

with Dr. Scott Schaffer, Otolaryngologist

Scott R. Schaffer, MD, FACS

Dr. Schaffer grew up in Bucks County and graduated from Gettysburg College, where he lettered in 2 sports for 4 years and was named All-American Honorable Mention in soccer. He received a Masters degree in Anatomy at Hahnemann University, and earned his MD from The Medical College of Pennsylvania, both in Philadelphia. Dr. Schaffer trained in Surgery and Otolaryngology at Temple University Hospital and St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children.

He joined the staff at Cooper Hospital in Camden, and quickly attained joint Associate Professorship in Surgery/Otolaryngology and Pediatrics; he also became the Head of the Section of Otolaryngology. During this time, Dr. Schaffer performed clinical research into various areas of ENT, including the science behind dangerous ear infections in diabetic patients.

Dr. Schaffer left Cooper in 1999 to open The ENT Specialty Center in Gibbsboro. He specializes in snoring, sinus, voice and thyroid problems in adults and children. He has clinical privileges in the Virtua Health System (Voorhees, Berlin and Marlton divisions) and at the Summit Surgery Center and Cooper Surgery Center, both in Voorhees.

While not caring for patients, Dr. Schaffer enjoys golf, outdoor adventure activities and photography.

For more information about Dr. Schaffer and his practice, visit:

 

Photo Above: Dr. Scott Schaffer


Listen to Diabetes Living Today® interview:

10/14/08 ~  Dr. Scott Schaffer, ENT

 

9/09/08 ~ Dr. Guri Bronner, Vitreoretinal Specialist

This week Dr. Fallon will interview Dr. Guri Bronner, Vitreoretinal Specialist. Listener’s are invited to call in with their questions and comments. 

Dr. Guri Bronner, Vitreoretinal Specialist

Drs Foxman, Foxman and Margolis are pleased to announce the addition of Guri Bronner, MD as their fourth vitreoretinal specialist. Dr. Bronner completed his Medical School at Robert Wood Johnson in New Brunswick, NJ and his Residency training at New Jersey Medical School. He then completed his fellowship training at the prestigious Vanderbilt University. He is equipped with knowledge and skills in the most advanced surgical and non-surgical techniques for treatment of diseases of the retina and vitreous. Dr. Bronner will also participate in the Clinical Trials Center at Retinal and Ophthalmic Consultants, helping to bring emerging new treatments to their patients before they are available elsewhere. Dr. Bronner is available for consultations at the Northfield, Cape May and Vineland offices.

Photo Above: Dr. Guri Bronner

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® interview:

9/09/08 ~ Dr. Guri Bronner, Vitreoretinal Specialist

 


10/07/08 ~ Diabetic Heart Disease with Dr. Ian Joffe, Cardiologist

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will interview Dr. Ian Joffe, Cardiologist. Listener’s are invited to call in with their questions and comments.

Dr. Ian Joffe, MD, FACC

Doctor Ian Joffe was born in South Africa. He attended Medical School at the University of Cape Town in Cape Town, South Africa, graduating with honors in the clinical rotations. Following medical school, he did research at Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. This research involved the effects of transplant drugs on bone and led to numerous publications. He then completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia.

His cardiology training followed at Harvard Medical School, at the Beth Israel Medical Center in Boston. Research at Beth Israel led to many publications and reviews in cardiology, including UpToDate, an online resource for medical students and doctors, and publications concerning diabetic heart disease.

Dr. Joffe is currently in private practive with Associated Cardiovascular Consultants in South Jersey. He is Chairman of the Virtua IRB.

He is married and has 2 children. He enjoys windsurfing and running in his spare time.

To learn more about Dr. Ian Joffe and his practice please visit:

Associated Cardiovascular Consultants, PA

Photo Above: Dr. Ian Joffe, MD, FACC

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® interview:

10/07/08 ~  Diabetic Heart Disease with Dr. Ian Joffe, Cardiologist

 


9/30/08 ~ Manny Hernandez, Diabetes Hands Foundation

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will interview Manny Hernandez, co-founder of “Diabetes Hands Foundation.” Listener’s are invited to call in with their questions and comments.

Manny Hernandez

Manny Hernandez is a Venezuelan-born Social Entrepreneur and a Community Strategist who has had LADA diabetes since 2003. In March 2007, he founded TuDiabetes.com, a community for people touched by diabetes in English, followed by EsTuDiabetes.com, a sister community for those who only speak Spanish. Since January 2008, he lives in California, where he co-founded the Diabetes Hands Foundation along with his wife, Andreina Davila. Besides running the two communities to help connect people touched by diabetes with the help of a number of passionate volunteers, the nonprofit works to raise diabetes awareness through programs such as Word In Your Hand.

 

Photo Above: Mr. Manny Hernandez

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9/30/08 ~ Manny Hernandez, Diabetes Hands Foundation


9/2/08 ~ Living with Juvenile Diabetes through the years.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will interview Parth Leach whose five year old daughter Nyssa was diagnosed with Juvenile Diabetes at the age of three. Also appearing with them in the studio will be Ms. Barbara Pancari who has lived with Juvenile Diabetes for the past “54” years! Listener’s are invited to call in with their questions and comments. 

Parth & Nyssa Leach

Parth A. Leach is a 38 year old married mother to two girls, ages 11 and 5, and a step-mother to a 16 year old girl.. She and her husband have been married for almost 13 years. Their youngest daughter, Nyssa, was diagnosed with Type 1, Juvenile, Diabetes in November, 2005. She had just “celebrated” her third birthday the previous day. The day of Nyssa was diagnosed she began a regimen of finger pokes (7 or more times per day), carbohydrate counting (for EVERY morsel of food), and insulin shots (4 or more per day)…every single day. She endured Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) for just over 2 years before beginning to use an insulin pump in January, 2008. An insulin pump eases some of the daily issues associated with Type 1 Diabetes, but it is not a cure. Nyssa must be connected to her pump 24/7 to be able to receive her life-saving insulin. She is still required to test her blood sugar 7 or more times per day. The insulin pump is connected to her via an infusion site which must be changed every two to three days. She does not enjoy site-change days…but she does not want to go back to a needle with every meal. We must find a cure.

Photo Above: Parth & Nyssa Leach

Ms. Barbara Pancari

Diagnosed with diabetes mellitus at age 8, I am now about to turn 62 years old and have had the disease for almost 54 years. Quite frankly, it is very unsettling to see this statistic in writing.

As a child my disease was controlled with first one, then two daily injections: Lente and Regular insulin in the morning, and Lente at dinnertime. Although throughout my childhood I was a very conscientious diabetic who almost never “cheated,” I suffered greatly with the dietary restrictions. I was on a rigid diet of “exchanges” which left very little room for variety. I hated being hungry so much of the time and I also hated HAVING to eat when I was not hungry.

When I became an adult I made the supremely stupid and irresponsible decision to start eating more of what I wanted. My insulin remained the same, but I began eating more sweets and other “forbidden” foods when I should not have. Through all this, I excelled in high school and college, graduating in 1968 magna cum laude with a B.A. in foreign languages. I became a high school language teacher.

At age 21 I decided to ignore the protests of my parents and travel to Madrid, Spain to study for a Master’s degree during one summer. It was an exhilarating experience, and I had no significant problems controlling my diabetes. Or so I thought…but the cheating continued. By the third year I decided to relocate to Madrid and work for one year. I cannot overemphasize how strongly my parents opposed this move. They were terrified for my health, but I persisted and made the move in 1971.

I spent almost eight wonderful years living and working in Madrid for several multinational firms. I had never thought it possible that I could survive – successfully – in a foreign country, and I am extremely grateful for the experience. Although I had no major health setbacks, I must admit to continually being lax with my diet. In hindsight, I realize I have been extremely fortunate to have not developed complications much earlier than I did. I never tested my sugar – I’m not even sure when home glucose monitors became available – and saw my endocrinologist only once a year, when I returned to the USA to visit my family. My parents, incidentally, continued to be extremely opposed to my living in Europe and berated me constantly.

For several reasons – none related to diabetes – I decided to return to the USA to live in late 1978. I was 32 years old. By my late 30s I had developed hypertension and had already been treated for diabetic retinopathy in both eyes.

By age 50 I was being treated for hypertension and hyperthyroidism and early stage kidney disease. In all these years my insulin regimen had not changed and I still was not checking my glucose levels. When it became increasingly apparent that I was in very poor control, my internist recommended an endocrinologist, Dr. Edward Ruby of Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia. Dr. Ruby prescribed taking only Regular at dinnertime, but also a third daily injection of Lente at bedtime. At first, I was devastated at the thought of an additional shot, but soon became accustomed to it as it formed part of my daily routine. For the first time I started getting my hemoglobin A1C levels checked. They were not good. Dr. Ruby advised going on the insulin pump, but I was extremely frightened at the thought of an accidental overdose, and the thought of wearing an apparatus was a complete turnoff.

By age 54 and realizing that a consistent fasting blood glucose level in the 400s was completely unacceptable, I made the life-changing decision to try the insulin pump, thanks in part to encouragement by Kitty Castellini. I chose the then-Minimed 508 model and attended training.

Again, I cannot overemphasize how frightened and overwhelmed I was with the thought of wearing and using the pump. After my training, which was five hours long, I was convinced I would never master it and cried bitterly in the doctor’s darkened waiting room. Fortunately, my then-boyfriend was with me and helped allay my fears. Notwithstanding, for the first few weeks I was on the Minimed hotline every single day with questions and concerns. But I did it. I mastered the pump.

Now, of course, I count carbohydrates like I should and I test my glucose about 12 times daily, or more if I’m having unexplained highs or lows. It doesn’t bother me in the least. My A1c results are much improved from pre-pump, but they could still be better. I have always been difficult to control and I continue to be, in spite of the more flexible lifestyle afforded by the pump. It is still a daily struggle, but at least I have the knowledge I am doing all I can to control my disease.

I have had serious complications, however. At age 43 I was diagnosed with one almost completely occluded (blocked) carotid artery. I had surgery at Jefferson and since that time have not had a recurrence, but it can happen. At age 56 I had a cerebral aneurysm that required a month-long hospitalization. It was a very slow recovery, since being on life support for a time had caused a horrendous infection in my throat that impeded my breathing for months. The incident occurred in September 2003 and the throat infection was not diagnosed until March 2004. I was referred to Jefferson’s Dr. Joseph Spiegel for laser surgery and had to wear a trach for several weeks following the two surgeries. They were successful, although my airway is not 100% clear and never will be. However, I am able to breathe normally, and am grateful for that. The entire experience of the aneurysm was the worst of my life, and I continue to live in fear of a recurrence.

I try very hard to control the hypertension and kidney disease, which seems to be responding to medication. Of course, I am very careful with any eye issues and see my retina specialist regularly. I perform aerobic exercise almost every day for 30 minutes. I hate it with all my heart but know it can benefit me greatly.

In summary, if I had to rank all the major problems in my life, diabetes would not be on the short list. I can see, I can walk, I can drive, I can go to work every day, and that is a privilege I do not take for granted. If I have to say so myself, I don’t even look that bad for my age!

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® interview:

9/2/08 ~ Living with Juvenile Diabetes through the years.


8/26/08 ~ Mr. Gary Kleiman, Executive Director of Medical Development at the University of Miami’s Diabetes Research Institute

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will interview Gary Kleiman, Executive Director of Medical Development at the University of Miami’s Diabetes Research Institute. Kitty had the opportunity to visit Gary several times at Diabetes Reseach Institute in Miami. Kitty describes Gary as spending the day with an old friend! Listener’s are invited to call in with their questions and comments. 

Gary Kleiman

Gary Kleiman, born in New York in 1953, has been an advocate for research toward a cure for diabetes for more than three decades.

Now, Executive Director of Medical Development at the University of Miami’s Diabetes Research Institute, Kleiman has testified before the House of Representatives Sub-Committee on Health and at the Capitol Summit for Diabetes Research about the need for increased diabetes research funding. He has written and been featured in magazines and newspaper articles and has made numerous appearances on local and national radio and television talk and news shows to discuss the impact of diabetes and research progress. Kleiman’s autobiography No Time To Lose (1983, William Morrow & Co., Inc.) is an account of his extraordinary life and achievements while coping with some of diabetes’ most severe complications. In 2006, he was featured in Cheating Destiny Living With Diabetes, America’s Biggest Epidemic (Houghton Mifflin Company) by James S. Hirsch.

Diagnosed with the disease at age six, he developed diabetic retinopathy by age 18 and was among the first to be treated with argon laser which has become the standard treatment for this eye disease. Later, at age 28, he required a kidney transplant and again, he was among the first to use a new immune suppressive drug, cyclosporine, to prevent rejection of his mother’s kidney. In 2001 a second transplant was needed. His brother, Glenn, donated one of his kidneys. On November 1, 2002, Kleiman received an infusion of insulin-producing islets which for the first time since 1960 freed him of insulin injections.

Although diabetes complications prevented his graduation, Kleiman attended Syracuse University as an art major, and played varsity tennis. He went on to become a recognized and accomplished sculptor with numerous commissioned works to his credit, including The International Pisart Vision Award sponsored by the Lighthouse for the Blind in New York.

In 1972, diabetes complications led Kleiman’s parents to what was then a small but highly reputable diabetes program at the University of Miami. The Kleiman’s went on to become one of the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation’s founding families and remain vocal in their support of the Institute.

In 1978, Gary himself began working for the Diabetes Research Institute as a youth counselor and diabetes camp coordinator. He went on to serve on the Board of Trustees of Eagle’s Nest Camp for Children with Diabetes in North Carolina. Later, Kleiman coordinated flights for donor organ procurement and served as managing editor for Pathways, a diabetes research magazine for lay readers.

Kleiman worked closely with the leadership of the Building and Construction Trades Department of the AFL-CIO as they financed and built the state-of-the-art building which today houses the Diabetes Research Institute. The internationally recognized institution, located at the University of Miami School of Medicine, was completed and inaugurated in 1994. Today, Kleiman helps lead the institute’s national fundraising and public affairs activities. He lives in Miami with his wife, Chris and two young sons, Ben and Daniel

Photo Above: Gary Kleiman

Rhoda Baer ~ Photographer

Photo Above: Gary Kleiman

Anastasia Walsh ~ Photographer

Photo Above: Gary Kleiman & Kitty Castellini

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® interview:

8/26/08 ~ Mr. Gary Kleiman, Executive Director of Medical Development at the University of Miami’s Diabetes Research Institute


 

8/19/08 ~ Jamie Dillinger, Nurse Practitioner

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will interview Jamie Dillinger, Nurse Practitioner. Listener’s are invited to call in with their questions and comments. 

Jamie Dillinger

Jamie Dillinger is a family nurse practitioner and a certified diabetes educator. Over the past eighteen months, she has been working at Suburban Endocrinology in Drexel Hill and Exton, Pennsylvania. She treats patients with diabetes.

Jamie was diagnosed with gestational diabetes in 1978 and then again in1982. Five years after this, symptoms of diabetes returned. She was told that she had type 2 diabetes. However, five years later required insulin. In 1994, she went on an insulin pump.

Jamie’s experience in diabetes started in 1991 where she was responsible for managing an outpatient diabetes education program. This program was the first of its kind in the area to focus on intensive management for patients on multiple daily injections and insulin pumps. During that time, she created a CD ROM that teaches patients how to count carbohydrates called Meals n Carbs. Her goal was to make meal planning and carbohydrate counting easier for patients. She also published several articles in Nursing Spectrum and the Diabetes Educator: articles on the recognition, prevention and treatment of hypoglycemia; insulin pump therapy; and carbohydrate counting. Jamie appeared in several newspaper and magazines articles where she discusses how she manages her life with diabetes. She has lectured for the American Diabetes Association, the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) and TRIADE, the local chapter of AADE.

In 1999, she went to work for Medtronic MiniMed as the clinical specialist for South Jersey, Philadelphia, and surrounding counties. During her time at Medtronic, Jamie was responsible for facilitating intensive management programs in diabetes centers and many physician practices. After leaving Medtronic, Jamie helped to create a glucose sensor program at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Jamie can be reached at her offices in Drexel Hill at 610 626-6317 and Exton at 610 524-7702.

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® interview:

8/19/08 ~ Jamie Dillinger, Nurse Practitioner