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INFORMATION-MOTIVATION-BEHAVIORAL SKILLS ANALYSIS ADVANCES UNDERSTANDING OF BARRIERS TO SELF-MONITORING OF BLOOD GLUCOSE

Last modified on 2011-01-11 17:31:58 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Utilization of Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model for Understanding Self-Monitoring OF Blood Glucose May be Useful for Overcoming Obstacles to Adherence

 

ORLANDO, FL (June 26, 2010) – An estimated 75 percent of adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes say they believe they know what their blood sugar levels are without testing, according to data presented at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 70th Scientific Sessions. These results are important to consider because self-monitoring with a blood glucose meter is essential for people with diabetes to obtain accurate blood sugar results that guide adjustments to meal planning, exercising and, most importantly for insulin users, accurately dosing their insulin. It is one of a number of key learnings from a study representing the first-ever use of the well-established information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model of health behavior practice to understand barriers to self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) among type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients.

Bayer Diabetes Care undertook the study to identify basic social and psychological factors that may be related to SMBG utilization in individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and to better understand the reasons why some people have difficulty adhering to SMBG as recommended by their health care providers. Another objective of the study was to determine whether the IMB model, which has been applied effectively in several health behavior domains, may be effective in helping to understand and promote adherence to SMBG. The study was conducted by a co-developer of the IMB model, Dr. William Fisher, distinguished university professor in the Department of Psychology and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada.

The study findings revealed substantial information gaps, motivational obstacles and behavioral skills limitations that stand in the way of adherence to SMBG. Additionally, they suggest that an IMB skills model for understanding SMBG may be conceptually and empirically worthwhile and may provide a basis for supportive educational and clinical interventions to assist individuals with diabetes to adhere to SMBG recommendations.

“There is a considerable amount of medical literature about adherence in diabetes, and a wide range of interventions have been shown to have a positive effect on knowledge, frequency and accuracy of SMBG. Maintaining change in SMBG over time has been variable, however, and may be dependent upon regular reinforcement. What’s been lacking is a well-integrated behavioral science model of factors that influence SMBG adherence,” said Dr. Fisher. “We are gratified to see that the IMB for understanding and promoting health behavior change has worked well in a number of areas, including the prediction and promotion of safer sexual behavior, medication adherence, and other areas, providing evidence of utility in understanding SMBG in diabetes.”

 

According to the IMB model, information about SMBG that is directly translatable into adherence and appropriate glycemic control based on blood sugar results, motivation to act on this information, and behavioral skills for acting effectively are the fundamental determinants of SMBG adherence. Well-informed and well-motivated individuals will apply their behavioral skills to affect adherence to SMBG over the long run. Health outcomes of SMBG form a feedback loop that can strengthen or weaken SMBG information, motivation and behavioral skills, and moderating factors in an individual’s environment-such as competing demands from family and work-may also influence a person’s ability to engage in SMBG.

Dr. Fisher presented the study in a poster, “Understanding Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose: An Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Analysis” at the ADA meeting. The poster was also highlighted during the ADA’s first ever guided audio poster tour – a new and innovative session added this year.

Additional Findings

A substantial number of individuals in the analysis reported information deficits with respect to SMBG. In a research sample of 416 adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, 46% and 53%, respectively, did not know that they should test after meals, and 21% and 40% did not know how to look for patterns in blood sugar readings. Further, as noted above, 75% say they don’t need to test because they believe they can gauge what their blood sugar levels are without testing.

Motivational obstacles to testing reported by adults with type 1 and type 2 included reports that testing constantly reminds them that they have diabetes (45% and 53%, respectively), is painful (34% and 35%), frustrating (26% and 25%) and time consuming (25% and 25%).

Behavioral skill limitations reported include difficulty testing without others knowing they are testing (29% and 20% for type 1 and type 2, respectively), difficulty downloading information from their blood sugar meter (27%, 24%), difficulty testing without too much pain (21% and 22%) and difficulty remembering to test (17% and 27%).

Importantly, findings from this research show a significant relationship between the presence of SMBG information gaps, SMBG motivational obstacles and SMBG behavioral skills limitations with reported frequency of SMBG for individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

“SMBG is increasingly seen as a behavioral tool in the management of diabetes,” said Dr. David Simmons, chief medical officer for Bayer Diabetes Care. “Bayer Diabetes Care was interested in determining whether the IMB model was appropriate to evaluate SMBG adherence in patients with diabetes. The depth of understanding of information gaps, motivational obstacles and behavioral skills limitations has helped us identify areas of patient education, professional education and development to improve products and services that Bayer can provide to customers.”

Study Design

The current research applied the IMB skills model of health behavior to identify correlations of frequency and adherence to recommended frequency of SMBG in a sample of 426 adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (type 1=208 and type 2=218).  Participants were enrolled in the Chronic Illness Panel of Harris Interactive and completed the survey online. Thirty-five SMBG information questions were rated on a 5-point like scale. Twenty-five SMBG motivation items were queried on 5-point and 7-point scales, and 34 SMBG behavioral skills items were rated on a 5-point scale. This was a cross-sectional study, which is a study done at one point in time, not over the course of time, and can measure the distribution and current relationships of characteristics of interest in a defined population.

Respondents who indicated strong disagreement, disagreement or neutral responses to correct information, or strong agreement, agreement or neutral responses to incorrect SMBG information were considered “uninformed.” Motivational items evaluating attitudes to personal performance of SMBG were assessed on a 5-point or 7-point scale and respondents on the negative side of the scale were coded as unmotivated.  On the SMBG behavioral skills scales, those who responded on the very difficult or difficult side of the scale were coded as unskilled.

Correlational analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between SMBG information, motivation and behavioral skills with average testing frequency. In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, all three correlated with testing frequency, with stronger correlations seen in the type 1 population.

Significant greater limitations, with respect to SMBG information and SMBG motivation (p<0.05), were reported among individuals with type 2 compared to type 1 diabetes. Item selection procedures that resulted in formation of internally consistent scales assessing the SMBG IMB were reported (alphas >0.80), and the pattern of significant relationships among SMBG IMB and frequency of SMBG in the samples of individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes were reported as well.

About Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Approximately 23.6 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes, which puts them at risk for developing serious health complications over time, such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and stroke.[1] Type 1 diabetes, also called juvenile diabetes, is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. In persons with type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin, which may result in many complications if glucose levels are not controlled.[2] Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed in adults, although increasingly, children are being diagnosed with this disease. Type 2 is associated with obesity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes, impaired glucose metabolism, physical inactivity and race/ethnicity.[3]  An estimated 30% of people with diabetes require insulin to manage their disease. Those who require insulin must closely monitor their blood sugar with a blood glucose meter to plan their meals, exercise regimens and insulin dosage.

Bayer Diabetes Care

Bayer Diabetes Care is a worldwide leader in diabetes care, supporting customers in 100 countries and, for more than 40 years, has led the way in diabetes care product innovation. Today, Bayer Diabetes Care offers an unparalleled choice in diabetes management systems and comprehensive support including education, tools and resources designed to simplify life with diabetes. Bayer Diabetes Care is a business of the Bayer HealthCare LLC, Medical Care Division and has its global headquarters located in Tarrytown, New York. Find more information at www.simplewins.com.

Bayer HealthCare

The Bayer Group is a global enterprise with core competencies in the fields of health care, nutrition and high-tech materials. Bayer HealthCare, a subsidiary of Bayer AG, is one of the world’s leading, innovative companies in the healthcare and medical products industry and is based in Leverkusen, Germany. The company combines the global activities of the Animal Health, Consumer Care, Medical Care and Pharmaceuticals divisions. The pharmaceuticals business operates under the name Bayer Schering Pharma. Bayer HealthCare’s aim is to discover and manufacture products that will improve human and animal health worldwide. Find more information at www.bayerhealthcare.com.

* The Diabetes Care Project Kicks-off Initiatives to Improve Health Outcomes for People with Diabetes *

Last modified on 2010-02-26 21:21:48 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Study Finds Medicare Beneficiaries Under Use of

Their Benefits is Driving Health Care Cost

 

An analysis of Medicare claims data, conducted by the National Minority Quality Forum (The Forum), covering a six-year period provides strong signals that Medicare beneficiaries with chronic diseases on whom Medicare spends the least are a major factor contributing to rising costs.  Results from this analysis show that beneficiaries with diabetes who consume the least-as evidenced by the level of reimbursement associated with their care-are more likely to cost the program significantly more in the short term.

These findings, with implications for health care reform, have prompted the formation of the Diabetes Care Project (DCP) (www.diabetescareproject.org).  Founded by The Forum and Roche Diagnostics, DCP is a new coalition of patient advocates and health partners who are committed to dramatically reducing acute events that are a consequence of diabetic complications through early interventions and improved chronic-care management.

About Diabetes

Diabetes is a growing public health epidemic affecting over 23 million Americans. According to the American Diabetes Association and the Centers for Disease Control, type 2 diabetes, fueled by rising rates of obesity, accounts for nearly 90-95 percent of all diabetics and disproportionately affects minority and aging populations in the US (nearly 20 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have diabetes). The U.S. spends approximately $174 billion in annual total costs for diagnosed diabetes with $166 billion in direct medical costs. Further, one out of every four Medicare dollars is spent on beneficiaries with diabetes, with a high percentage attributed to tertiary illness caused by unmanaged or undermanaged diabetes.

About the National Minority Quality Forum

The National Minority Quality Forum (http://www.nmqf.org) was founded in 1998 as a nonprofit organization. Its mission is to strengthen national and local efforts to eliminate the disproportionate burden of premature death and preventable illness in racial and ethnic minorities and other special populations through the use of evidence-based, data-driven initiatives, including a series of health atlases (http://www.z-atlas.com).

About American Association of Diabetes Educators

AADE is a multi-disciplinary professional membership organization dedicated to improving diabetes care through education. With more than 12,000 professional members including nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, physicians, and others, AADE has a vast network of practitioners involved in the daily treatment of diabetes patients. Collectively, our alliances, member practitioner networks, and academic partners uniquely position AADE at the locus of change for the future treatment of diabetes.

For more information, please visit: www.diabeteseducator.org.

About Roche Diabetes Care

Roche Diabetes Care is a pioneer in the development of blood glucose monitoring systems and a global leader for diabetes management systems and services. For more than 30 years, Roche has been committed to helping people with diabetes live lives that are as normal and active as possible and has been helping healthcare professionals manage their patients’ condition in an optimal way. Today, the ACCU-CHEK portfolio offers people with diabetes and healthcare professionals innovative products, services and comprehensive solutions for convenient, efficient and effective diabetes management-from blood glucose monitoring through information management to insulin delivery. The ACCU-CHEK brand encompasses blood glucose meters, infusion pumps, lancing and data management systems.

For more information, please visit accu-chek.com.

About Roche

Headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, Roche is a leader in research-focused healthcare with combined strengths in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. Roche is the world’s largest biotech company with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, virology, inflammation, metabolism and CNS. Roche is also the world leader in in-vitro diagnostics, tissue-based cancer diagnostics and a pioneer in diabetes management. Roche’s personalized healthcare strategy aims at providing medicines and diagnostic tools that enable tangible improvements in the health, quality of life and survival of patients.

In 2008, Roche had over 80,000 employees worldwide and invested almost 9 billion Swiss francs in R & D. The Group posted sales of 45.6 billion Swiss francs. Genentech, United States, is a wholly owned member of the Roche Group. Roche has a majority stake in Chugai Pharmaceutical, Japan. For more information: www.roche-diagnostics.us.

About Healthways

Healthways is the leading provider of specialized, comprehensive solutions to help millions of people maintain or improve their health and well-being and, as a result, reduce overall costs. Healthways’ solutions are designed to help healthy individuals stay healthy, mitigate and slow the progression to disease associated with family or lifestyle risk factors and promote the best possible health for those already affected by disease. Our proven, evidence-based programs provide highly specific and personalized interventions for each individual in a population, irrespective of age or health status, and are delivered to consumers by phone, mail, internet and face-to-face interactions, both domestically and internationally. Healthways also provides a national, fully accredited complementary and alternative Health Provider Network and a national Fitness Center Network, offering convenient access to individuals who seek health services outside of, and in conjunction with, the traditional healthcare system.

For more information, please visit: www.healthways.com

AMERICAN WARRIOR SEVERELY INJURED IN AFGHANISTAN RECEIVES HISTORIC ISLET CELL TRANSPLANT

Last modified on 2009-12-16 19:48:46 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Diabetes Research Institute aids in life-saving procedure on Thanksgiving

(December 15, 2009)  A 21-year-old airman severely injured while serving his country in a remote area of Afghanistan is recovering at Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) in Washington, D.C. after several surgeries and an unprecedented transplant. The extraordinary care is an example of military and civilian medical experts working together in the first known case of a successful isolation and transplantation of insulin-producing cells following a severe trauma requiring complete removal of the pancreas.  Camillo Ricordi M.D. and his team at the Diabetes Research Institute played a major role in the life-saving effort.

The airman was struck by three high velocity bullets on November 21 and was operated on twice by surgeons in forward combat medical bases in Salerno and Bagram, both in Afghanistan.  The surgeries included a rare but life-saving trauma Whipple, in which the head of the pancreas, a portion of the stomach, gallbladder, and entire duodenum were removed.  In addition, a portion of the airman’s large and small bowels were also removed.

A procedure to prevent infection was later performed at a military base in Germany, before the wounded warrior was transferred by the Air Force Critical Care Air Transport teams to Walter Reed four days after the initial injury.

The airman was taken back to the operating room at Walter Reed by Dr. Craig Shriver, chief of general surgery, to have his entire intra-abdominal structure reconstructed. During this operation, what was remaining of the airman’s pancreas was found to be damaged beyond repair from the gunshot wounds. “The optimal procedure at this point was to remove his entire remaining pancreas to prevent further leakage of the pancreatic enzymes and control the bleeding, which could be fatal,” said Dr. Shriver. “We knew that the procedure would lead to the most severe and life-threatening form of diabetes, which tends to be very brittle and difficult to control in this type of situation.”

At this point in the operation, Dr. Shriver sought the opinion of Dr Rahul Jindal, a transplant surgeon at Walter Reed and a clinical professor of surgery at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.  Dr. Jindal had training and experience in islet cell transplantation, which is considered the best hope for curing diabetes.

In islet cell transplantation, the insulin-producing islets are isolated from a donor pancreas and then reinfused in a patient’s liver where they later begin to produce insulin.

“Isolation and purification of pancreatic islets is a very intricate procedure which requires a specialized laboratory, and there are only a few such facilities in the United States,” said Dr. Jindal.  “I knew the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine had such a facility and I put a call in to its director, Dr. Camillo Ricordi, for his assistance in isolating the islets from our airman’s removed pancreas.”

Dr. Ricordi, scientific director at the Diabetes Research Institute, developed the method for isolating the islet cells from the pancreas and is considered a pioneer in the field. He immediately agreed to help, in his words, “anything to help a wounded warrior.”

Dr. Shriver proceeded to remove the remaining portion of the pancreas; and Drs. Jindal and Eric Elster, a Navy transplant surgeon, flushed the harvested pancreas and intact spleen with a special preservation solution, packed it in ice and transported it by courier to Miami.

“The organ arrived at 11 o’clock the night before Thanksgiving, and my cell processing team at the Diabetes Research Institute spent the next six hours performing the islet isolation and purification procedure,” explains Dr. Ricordi.  “More than 220,000 purified islets were then suspended in a specialized cold solution and flown back to Walter Reed.”

Late in the afternoon on Thanksgiving Day, the cells were successfully injected into the patient’s portal vein into his liver with Dr. Ricordi and his team coordinating the procedure via an internet connection with surgeons at Walter Reed.

Less than one week after surgery, there was clear evidence of pancreas islet function in the wounded warrior’s liver, as shown by the presence of a specialized blood test called c-peptide. Fifteen days after the procedure, that same blood test indicated the transplanted islet cells were functioning in the normal range. As time goes on, the pancreatic islets in the liver will take up new blood supply and the patient’s requirement of exogenous insulin is expected to further decrease, facilitating diabetes management and preventing the onset of complications of the disease, and improving his overall quality of life.

Teamwork and close coordination between the many professionals in the entire Military Trauma System at Walter Reed and at the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami made this possible. This procedure may allow for more cases of islet transplantation following traumatic injury to the pancreas, where purification and transplantation of the insulin producing cells from even a segment of the rescued organ could prevent the development of severe diabetes and its complications.

BAYER INTRODUCES CONTOUR USB – THE FIRST BLOOD GLUCOSE METER WITH UNIQUE PLUG & PLAY DIABETES MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE

Last modified on 2010-12-24 01:28:45 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

TARRYTOWN, NY (September 21, 2009)– Bayer Diabetes Care today announced U.S. Food & Drug Administration clearance to market the CONTOUR® USB blood glucose meter. Bayer’s CONTOUR USB is the first and only blood glucose monitor that plugs directly into a computer providing users with instant access to information that can help optimize diabetes management. The CONTOUR USB meter is integrated with GlucofactsTM DELUXE software for easy retrieval of data as well as longer-term tracking and analysis of blood glucose test results.

Bayer’s CONTOUR USB meter is a cutting edge, premium meter that connects directly to a PC or MAC and the meter can store up to 2,000 test results. The built-in USB technology allows patients to simply plug in to gain knowledge about trends and patterns in their blood glucose levels.

Ongoing data tracking and accurate information sharing are key to good diabetes management. The CONTOUR USB meter facilitates data organization and management – transforming results into meaningful insights that healthcare professionals and their patients can readily discuss.

“This is an ideal blood glucose monitor for patients who are highly engaged in managing their diabetes, particularly those on insulin who must test frequently,” said David Simmons, MD, chief medical officer for Bayer Diabetes Care. “With the CONTOUR USB meter, patients are able to review their results with their healthcare professional during an office visit, over the phone, or via email, giving them the opportunity to make treatment adjustments, such as taking action to reduce their A1C levels, if necessary.”

Measurement of A1C provides an average assessment of blood sugar levels over the past three months – and is an indicator of how well diabetes is being controlled over the longer term. Studies have shown that routine tracking of blood glucose can help patients better manage their blood sugar and may result in a lower A1C level, which is important for consistent diabetes management. In fact, even a one-percent reduction in A1C reduces the risk of serious complications by 40 percent.

Bayer’s CONTOUR USB meter features:
·        A bright color display screen visible in any light that shows average, high and low readings with
·        Customizable features such as intuitive pre- and post-meal marking
·        500MB extra memory for storage of personal diabetes information
·        Rechargeable battery that can charge from any USB port or via the CONTOUR USB wall charger provided
·        GlucofactsTM DELUXE diabetes management software (use of Bayer’s diabetes management software has been shown to significantly lower A1C  and a sustained A1C reduction could lead to potential cost savings.)

 

The CONTOUR USB meter is based on Bayer’s trusted CONTOUR system, providing the same easy accuracy, No CodingTM technology, no interference with maltose, galactose, and oxygen and automatic correction for hematocrit and common interfering substances (e.g. acetaminophen, ascorbic acid), as well as a 5-second test time and small (0.6 µL) sample size – all helping to simplify life with diabetes. The CONTOUR USB meter uses CONTOUR blood glucose test strips currently available for other CONTOUR meters.

Nick Jonas of The Jonas Brothers, who has diabetes and is a diabetes ambassador for Bayer, said, “I already use Bayer’s CONTOUR meter to monitor my blood glucose and my doctor always talks about how important it is to track my results. I am excited to try out the new CONTOUR USB meter, because I can plug it in to a computer from wherever I am to get the information I need to manage my diabetes.”

Bayer’s CONTOUR USB meter will soon be available for sale in the U.S. For more information, visit www.BayerContourUSB.com or www.simplewins.com.

About Diabetes
Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Approximately 23.6 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes, which puts them at risk for developing serious health complications over time, such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness, and stroke.  Type 1 diabetes, also called juvenile diabetes, is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. In persons with type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin, which may result in many complications if glucose levels are not controlled.  Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed in adults, although increasingly, children are being diagnosed with this disease. Type 2 is associated with obesity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes, impaired glucose metabolism, physical inactivity, and race/ethnicity.

Bayer Diabetes Care
Bayer Diabetes Care, is a worldwide leader in diabetes, supporting customers in 100 countries, and for more than 40 years, has led the way in diabetes care product innovation. Bayer introduced the first portable blood glucose meter and test strips, innovated the measurement of A1C (glycated hemoglobin) with A1CNow+® and A1CNow®SELFCHECK and was the first to offer a suite of blood glucose monitors (CONTOUR® and BREEZE®2). Certain features of Bayer’s blood glucose monitors such as No Coding technology and no interference from maltose and galactose make diabetes management easier. Today, Bayer Diabetes Care offers an unparalleled choice in diabetes management systems and comprehensive support including education, tools and resources designed to simplify life with diabetes.

Bayer Diabetes Care is a business of the Bayer HealthCare LLC, Medical Care Division and has its global headquarters located in Tarrytown, New York. For more information visit www.bayerdiabetes.com or in the U.S. www.simplewins.com.

Bayer HealthCare
The Bayer Group is a global enterprise with core competencies in the fields of health care, nutrition and high-tech materials. Bayer HealthCare, a subsidiary of Bayer AG, is one of the world’s leading, innovative companies in the healthcare and medical products industry and is based in Leverkusen, Germany. The company combines the global activities of the Animal Health, Consumer Care, Medical Care and Pharmaceuticals
divisions. The pharmaceuticals business operates under the name Bayer Schering
Pharma. Bayer HealthCare’s aim is to discover and manufacture products that will
improve human and animal health worldwide. Find more information at www.bayerhealthcare.com

Teen pop sensation Nick Jonas (of The Jonas Brothers) addresses the National Press Club on the topic of juvenile diabetes.

Last modified on 2009-08-25 19:50:02 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

NICK JONAS SPEAKS AT NATIONAL PRESS CLUB IN EFFORT TO EDUCATE, SUPPORT, AND INSPIRE KIDS WITH DIABETES

Teen pop sensation Nick Jonas (of The Jonas Brothers) addresses the National Press Club on the topic of juvenile diabetes.

Washington, DC (August 24, 2009) – Nick Jonas today made a passionate plea to an audience of journalists at the National Press Club asking them to raise more awareness about type 1 diabetes to motivate young people like him and their families to properly manage their condition. Nick, 16, is one of the youngest guests ever invited to speak at the Club. He talked about his own journey with diabetes, the charitable efforts of the Jonas Brothers’ Change for the Children Foundation and why he embraces the role of diabetes ambassador.

Nick recounted that until he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes almost four years ago, he didn’t know anything about, or anybody else with, the condition. That has all since changed. With the love and support of his family, he has learned how to live with and manage his condition. He wrote the song, “A Little Bit Longer,” to share that experience and inspire others. In 2007 Nick went public with his diabetes. The impact of that announcement and his subsequent work with the Bayer Diabetes Care NicksSimpleWins.com campaign has had far reaching global impact, helping to raise awareness of the disease. Much more needs to be done, he said, and he asked reporters to help.

“So many fans with diabetes from all over the world share their stories and thank me for being an inspiration to them,” said Nick. “It’s important for them to know that they motivate and inspire me as well. I’m lucky to have a great support system in my family as well as the tools I need to manage my diabetes properly. By speaking publicly about my experience I hope to increase diabetes awareness, encourage diabetes education and help fundraising for research and other programs for kids with diabetes. The more you report about diabetes, the more people will know,” he told members of the press.

Nick’s passion for helping other young people with diabetes by sharing his experience is just one of the ways he “gives back” to fans. He and his brothers, Kevin and Joe, started the Jonas Brothers’ Change for the Children Foundation through which they donate funds to several causes including pediatric diabetes research, education and treatment.

 “When Nick talks about diabetes, people listen. And until there is a cure, the greatest weapon against diabetes is increased awareness and knowing how to manage it,” said Nancy Katz, head of North America for Bayer Diabetes Care. “That includes working with a health care professional for guidance on regular monitoring of blood sugar and A1C levels, proper diet and exercise and having a positive attitude to achieve every day simple wins.”

Since the announcement of their partnership last year, Bayer and Nick have taken many steps to inspire young people with diabetes to achieve their simple wins: small, everyday victories for managing diabetes that can lead to big differences over time.

In recognition of his efforts in raising diabetes awareness over the past year, Bayer presented Nick with another $100,000 donation to the Jonas Brothers’ Change for the Children Foundation to support its ongoing commitment to pediatric diabetes.

In August 2008, announcing the start of their partnership with Nick, Bayer presented the Jonas Brothers with a $100,000 donation for their foundation. In the interim, Nick and Bayer created special dog tags, like the one Nick wears featuring a lyric from his song, “A Little Bit Longer.” Proceeds from the sales of the dog tags benefit the Jonas Brothers’ Change for the Children Foundation. The dog tags are available through www.NicksSimpleWins.com for a donation of $5. Since the dog tag program launched in November 2008, it has raised an additional $75,000 for the Jonas Brothers’ Change for the Children Foundation.

As this year marks the 40-year anniversary since Bayer introduced the first portable blood glucose meter, the company hopes that its ongoing partnership with Nick reinforces their commitment to diabetes management. To learn more about Nick’s personal experiences with diabetes, his programs with Bayer and to read his blog, please go to www.NicksSimpleWins.com.

Bayer Diabetes Care

Bayer Diabetes Care is a worldwide leader in diabetes, supports customers in 100 countries and for more than 40 years, has led the way in diabetes care product innovation. Bayer introduced the first portable blood glucose meter and test strips, innovated the measurement of A1C (glycated hemoglobin) and was the first to offer a suite of blood glucose monitors (CONTOUR® and BREEZE®2) with No CodingTM technology and no interference with common substances such as maltose. Today, Bayer Diabetes Care offers an unparalleled choice in diabetes management systems and comprehensive support including education, tools and resources designed to simplify life with diabetes.

Bayer Diabetes Care is a business of the Bayer HealthCare LLC, Medical Care Division and has its global headquarters located in Tarrytown, New York. For more information visit www.bayerdiabetes.com.

 

About Bayer HealthCare

The Bayer Group is a global enterprise with core competencies in the fields of healthcare, nutrition and high-tech materials. Bayer HealthCare, a subsidiary of Bayer AG, is one of the world’s leading, innovative companies in the healthcare and medical products industry and is based in Leverkusen, Germany. The company combines the global activities of the Animal Health, Bayer Schering Pharma, Consumer Care and Medical Care divisions. Bayer HealthCare’s aim is to discover and manufacture products that will improve human and animal health worldwide. Find more information at www.bayerhealthcare.com.

Great news for Deltec Cozmo users!

Last modified on 2009-08-25 15:36:37 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Changing your insulin pump company is a hard decision even under the best of circumstances. If you are a Deltec Cozmo user, you now find yourself in a very difficult position with the recent announcement that Smiths Medical will no longer be producing insulin pumps. Here at Roche Diagnostics, the makers of ACCU-CHEK® brand diabetes care products, we understand the challenge you now face and we want to do everything we can to make your transition as simple as possible.

To that end, we’ve designed the ACCU-CHEK Alliance Program just for Deltec Cozmo users offering an easy and affordable transition to a brand new ACCU-CHEK Spirit insulin pump system. If your Cozmo insulin pump is still in-warranty, here’s what you’ll receive when you sign up for the program:

  • The ACCU-CHEK® Spirit insulin pump system* without charge with the trade-in of your Cozmo Pump.
  • 2 Year Warranty
  • 30 Day Supply Starter Kit
  • Upgrade certificate for a new insulin pump system launched in the future by Roche Diagnostics without additional charge with your trade-in of the ACCU-CHEK Spirit insulin pump. Certificate expires 2 years from shipment date of ACCU-CHEK Spirit insulin pump.

*The system includes the ACCU-CHEK Spirit insulin pump, ACCU-CHEK blood glucose meter of your choice, Palm® PDA and the ACCU-CHEK Pocket Compass Software with bolus calculator.

So not only are you receiving a new insulin pump system (brand new, not refurbished!), but you’re alsogetting the peace of mind in knowing that you’ve got a future upgrade at no additional charge when new technology becomes available.

If you’d like to learn more about this special offer or about the ACCU-CHEK Spirit insulin pump system, please call us at 866-703-3476. This is a limited time offer and only available to current in-warranty Deltec Cozmo users, so contact us today!

Terms and Exclusions:

  • This promotion is effective from August 1, 2009, but may be discontinued or modified at any time without notice.
  • Only in-warranty Deltec Cozmo insulin pump users are eligible.
  • Available to U.S. residents only. Persons covered by federal, state or government-funded healthcare programs (such as Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Administration) and the residents of Massachusetts may not participate.

DIABETES AND SOCIAL MEDIA—A NO SUGAR ADDED™ EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY THAT COULD SAVE BILLIONS!

Last modified on 2010-12-24 01:32:28 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

 The statistics are well publicized and the impact felt every day by every American. The physical, emotional and financial effects of diabetes on the country are devastating and getting worse. According to experts, diabetes costs the nation an estimated $150 to $200 billion annually in health care expenses and billions more in lost productivity. Year after year we hear about diabetes migrating from adults to young adults to teens to kids because of our sedentary (a.k.a. couch potato) lifestyle and how the numbers keep growing. The debate about our healthcare delivery system and universal coverage will continue and while it may or may not get resolved during this congressional session or even this presidency, we need answers, NOW. We must find ways to address our diabetes epidemic.

So, what’s a possible answer?

I recently attended a Social Media Summit sponsored by Roche Diagnostic, one of the major pharmaceutical companies involved with diabetes, along with more than two dozen other diabetes “influencers.” We were brought together to talk, brainstorm and consider the impact of social media on the diabetic community. We spent much time and effort examining social media’s ability to “educate” the diabetic masses and those close to them who are often responsible for care and oversight. This wasn’t a sales and marketing presentation and we didn’t hear about products and branding. This was a Summit focused on diabetes, the desperate need for more and more successful education and an exploration into how social media can help spread the diabetes education message and empower individuals to take control of their condition. The long-range outcome would be to see this increased education derived from social media to produce a new-found personal responsibility to reduce health risks and the nation’s health care costs.

I have been dealing with the ravages of diabetes for a good part of my life and live with many of its scars, so I know the destruction diabetes can cause. I have also dedicated a good portion of my adult life, and plenty of resources as well, to informing and educating people on the disease. I’d like to believe I’ve made a positive impact in educating people on how to live better with diabetes and how to keep on fighting. But, I also know we all need to do more. I believe the Internet and global reach of social media may provide the widest, most in-depth and least expensive opportunity to broadcast our message that you can do it yourself with the proper information that we’ve ever had. I also believe that for many, social media presents the most believable and credible means of informing a “hungry”, pardon my pun, population with the educational tools derived and learned by their peers and therein might be the secret to spreading the word and having it accepted.

We covered this topic in detail as a group and discussed various strategies we’d need to consider. We also talked about the pitfalls social media presents and the responsibilities each of us as “influencers” have to monitor the posted information for accuracy and appropriateness. As a group, we agreed that greater reach was a primary objective of any social media effort and that reach, combined with the believability social media engenders, was an important goal. We also agreed that with one of social media’s greatest strengths being the delivery of information from trusted, peer-like sources, perhaps this was the greatest opportunity available to deliver critical information that would be accepted as though it were being delivered by a close friend or relative. With the closely shared life-experiences social media thrives on, delivering a stronger and deeper diabetes education could very well be like having a sit down talk with your neighbor at the breakfast table with your neighbor actually hailing from across the country or perhaps, across the globe!

As we all left the Summit, I could feel that we’d made progress and learned more about the impact social media could have on our “diabetic community.” We would all be going our separate ways but would remain united in our understanding that the opportunities social media presents would make our work even more meaningful. Through the power of social media, we could surpass our current reach and expand levels of “trust” beyond anything we’d seen before and that might be the key to unlocking the education door for diabetics who otherwise were not being reached or were not “trusting” of the information they were receiving. We also came to understand that social media would give us, and others involved in diabetes education, the ability to inform our diabetic brethren at a levels beyond anything we have ever seen before. For sure, I am more attuned than before to the opportunities social media presents and its ability to deliver critical information and education to greater numbers with “no sugar added.”

Kitty Castellini

Founder, President & CEO

Diabetes Living Today®—Was founded by a “passionate” Doctor and Patient who battled type 1 diabetes and won!  Diabetes Living Today® is a multi-media source paving the way to improve the lives of all diabetics worldwide.

FDA Issues Warning on GDH-PQQ Test Strips

Last modified on 2010-12-24 01:31:39 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Glucose DeHydrogenase PyrroloQuinoline Quinone is a type of glucose monitoring technology  The FDA issued a health notice alerting anyone using GDH-PQQ technology and receiving drug therapies or products containing certain sugars other than glucose such as: maltose, xylose and galactose can lead to serious injury or death.

Drug products or therapies with non-glucose sugars

  • Extraneal (icodextrin) peritoneal dialysis solution
  • Some immunoglobulins: Octagam 5%, Gamimune N 5% **, WinRho SDF Liquid, Vaccinia Immune Globulin Intravenous (Human) and HepaGamB
  • Orencia (abatacept)
  • Adept adhesion reduction solution (4% icodextrin)
  • BEXXAR radioimmunotherapy agent
  • Any product that contains, or the body breaks down into, the sugars maltose, galactose or xylose

This is the reason for concern: These types of sugars can create a false glucose reading on your meter which will prompt more insulin coverage for a higher blood sugar leading to severe hypoglycemia. Hence the serious injury or death concern.

IMO this has to be very rare especially if you check your blood sugar often. Like me for instance 10-12x per day. Although not everyone is that anal retentive.

Who should be concerned with this? People on peritoneal dialysis and people who recently had surgery.

**Glucose test strips other than the GDH-PQQ type are not affected by this problem, and can be used by patients taking drug products or therapies that contain non-glucose sugars.

If you are concerned if your strips use this technology there is a list of GDH-PQQ Glucose Test Strips Here
—–
Roche Diagnostics is among the listed with their ACCU-CHEK® test strips.

Andreas  Stuhr, MD, medical director of Roche Diabetes Care North America put out a patient letter today stating this:

It is important to know that this is not a recall of the ACCU-CHEK® blood glucose monitors

The FDA notes that “GDH-PQQ meters and strips are okay to use if you are not using an interfering drug product or therapy” as listed above.  For those who are using drugs that contain non-glucose sugars, the FDA recommends the following:

  • Do not use GDH-PQQ glucose meters or test strips

• Use another type of glucose monitoring technology and continue to monitor your blood glucose as instructed by your healthcare provider
• Contact your healthcare provider if your results do not reflect the way you feel

Patient safety is important to Roche.  ACCU-CHEK® products have been proven to provide accurate and reliable results for patients with diabetes, when used as directed in package inserts.

Should you have any additional questions or concerns regarding ACCU-CHEK® products, please call ACCU-CHEK® Customer Care, available twenty four hours, seven days a week at 1-800-858-8072.
—–
Bayer Healthcare also contacted me as well with this statement:

Bayer’s CONTOUR and Bayer’s BREEZE2 Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Do Not Use Problematic GDH-PQQ Technology

Bayer Diabetes Care is committed to patient safety and has a portfolio of blood glucose meters that all meet the current FDA requirements.  The company adheres to and supports the highest standard of quality in its meters and strives to do everything possible by a manufacturer to ensure the accuracy of readings. Bayer Diabetes Care meters are designed to minimize the impact from as many external variants as possible, helping to ensure accuracy of readings.  Bayer’s BREEZE®2 and CONTOUR® systems both feature No CodingTM technology, and no interference with common substances including the non-glucose sugars maltose and galactose.

For more information on Bayer Diabetes Care blood glucose monitoring systems, visit www.bayerdiabetes.com.

“Roche host Diabetes Care Social Media Summit ~ A Meeting of The Minds”

Last modified on 2010-12-24 01:34:15 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

“Roche host Diabetes Care Social Media Summit ~ A Meeting of The Minds”

 

 

Exciting and curious don’t begin to describe how I felt when I recently traveled to the Roche Diabetes Care Social Media Summit. On July 22nd and 23rd. I was selected by Roche as one of 29 of what they considered to be the most influential “diabetic patient advocates” or Internet “bloggers” to come together for a “meeting of the minds” at their  North American headquarters in Indianapolis, IN.

My invitation had arrived in early Spring and within five weeks all travel plans were finalized by Roche for all 29 advocates.  The concept behind the “Social Media Summit” we were told, was to assemble a group Roche considered as the top social media “influencers.” The group would consist of writers, journalist, authors, broadcasters, bloggers and most importantly, compassionate, dedicated  people currently living with diabetes. Each participant had to have demonstrated a commitment to making a “positive change” in the diabetic world. Each would have to play an active role in discussing how the Internet, and specifically social media and networking, could educate and help pave the road for a better way of life for diabetics.

So, with that as a backdrop, we all flew in from various parts of the country filled with excitement, different expectations and wonder.  As the summit approached, and as we arrived at our destination, our high tech group was burning up “Blackberrys” with greetings to old friends and welcomes to those meeting for the first time. We all arrived with our separate agendas. I came with an open mind and heart. I came to listen and learn. I wanted to hear first-hand what Roche, the world’s largest manufacturer of glucose meters and test strips, had to say and what they wanted to do in the social media world. As so many diabetics already know, Roche Diagnostics makes ACCU-CHEK® Aviva and  Compact Plus meter systems among many other products for diabetics and is considered a world leader in the field.

Our meetings began with Roche Diabetes Care Executive Leadership at Roche’s North American headquarters. That evening we were greeted by the Roche team at Maggiano’s Little Italy Restaurant and were hosted by Luc Vierstarete, Senior Vice President and General Manager Roche Care North America. I had a wonderful conversation with Mr. Vierstarete talking about diabetes and the importance of education and how best to reach those living with diabetes.  I immediately learned that we were both on the same page believing that “Diabetes Education is the key” to living healthier and that one essential way to spread the knowledge was via the Internet and social media. We agreed that education is a critical component in helping people with diabetes live better and longer lives and that we must work together to figure out how to use social media to reach as many people as possible to educate them about the disease.

I’ve been living with Juvenile Diabetes for over 40 years, having been diagnosed at the tender age of three.  I’ve suffered greatly as a result of this disease and truly understand its complications. I know that had there been better “diabetes education” available to me, readily available on the Internet or through social “chats” with other diabetics and influencers, I might not have temporarily lost my eye site back in 2001. Perhaps I could have avoided the surgeries and eye diseases I endured on a daily basis. I might not have suffered so dearly from diabetic gastropersis, unable to digest food and making it difficult to match insulin to food needs. My life probably would not have been the daily roller coaster it was. From my hypoglycemia to my being confused because I was unaware my blood/glucose reading was 23, education about my condition would have changed my life drastically.

Our group consisted of 26 people with type 1 diabetes, 2 type 2’s and one former type 1 diabetic, me. I was cured with a successful long-term Pancreas Transplant Alone (PTA) on August 13, 2004 at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, MD.  There were plenty of insulin pumps and CGM’s going off throughout the two day event with highs and lows everywhere.  I had never been in one room with so many influential diabetics in my life.  It was an honor and privilege to be among this distinguished group.

From the start, it was clear to me that the Roche people were on the right path. Dan Kane, Vice President of marketing said that we were not invited to hear about their products or talk about the company and he was true to his words. At no point in our meetings did we hear about Roche.  Not one word! This was no sales job but instead a true “meeting of the minds.” Roche was big on the word “education” throughout the entire event without question. Our goal was to grasp the problem, the lack of education or the inability to reach enough people affectively, and to figure out how to use emerging technologies and social connections to help overcome the education divide.

Dan shared an appropriate analogy with us. He described the evening as being similar to your first 7th grade dance, with the boys on one side of the room and the girls on the other.  I suddenly realized he was right as we all had our interests and agendas but at no other time had we come together in such a formidable way. Roche had brought us together to share our points of view, our thoughts and to observe and learn. And, in their effort, each of us was going to learn as well, straight from the minds and mouths of other influencers.

 

Photo Above:  Social Media Summit Thought Leaders

In the photo above:
1) Riva Greenberg
2) Ginger Vieira
3) Kelly Kunik
4) Fran Carpentier
5) Crystal Lane (a.k.a. Calpumper)
6) Kitty Castellini
7) Sandra Miller
8) Christel Marchand
9) David Edelman
10) Brandy Barnes
11) Bennet Dunlap
12) Lee Ann Thill
13) Allison Blass
14) Gina Capone
15) Jeff Hitchcock
16) Kerri Morrone
17) Manny Hernandez
18) Chris Bishop
19) Amy Tenderich
20) Kelly Close
21) Christopher Thomas
22) Scott King
23) Bernard Farrell
24) Scott Strumello
25) George Simmons
26) Scott Johnson
27) William Lee Dubois
28) David Mendosa
29) Charlie Cherry

I was honored to be seated at dinner with Randall Cole, National Director, Channel, Clinical, Sales Administration for ACCU-CHEK® Insulin Pump, Nathalie Chiasson, Vice President Gloabal Market Intelligence and IM/E – marketing, Lisa Huse, Director of Professional Marketing, and Kim Gutzwiller, Marketing Communications Consultant.  We shared a wonderful evening of tears and laughs, discussing the challenges diabetics face and how together, we can make a difference through social media.

Day 2 was an early morning start as we headed to Roche Diagnostics Corp. U.S. Headquarters.  We worked through breakfast with additional introductions taking place. We brainstormed for hours, both on an individual basis and in groups. We responded to questions about how many diabetics were currently being reached with information? How could we reach more? How could we have an impact on those living in the “diabetic closet?” With our thoughts always positive we talked about the best ways to reach patients, doctors, educators, family and friends and how we could keep these groups engaged.

We shared out thoughts about diabetes as a global problem in dire need of attention.  We reiterated the fact that studies show 4 out of 10 diabetics are not currently testing their blood sugar levels and some don’t even know how or the importance of doing so. We discussed how you deal with the fact that over two-thirds of those affected with diabetes do not have the basic math skills and basic levels of literacy to properly deal with their diabetes and how to overcome this. We shared our opinions on the critical need to improve diabetes education and self-management skills.

Of course, we also discussed the high cost of treating diabetes today, estimated at over $132 billion dollars this year alone.  We debated the issues surrounding our current medical system, a hot topic on the front pages of the nation’s newspapers and web sites, and the challenges to those with insurance and for those without. Throughout it all, we listened and learned from one another and so too did Roche.

As the day moved on, there was an optional Roche Diabetes Care Manufacturing Facilities Tour.   The tour took about 40 minutes and I can tell you I have never seen so many test strips at one time in my entire life!  Here take a look:

 Photo Above: Roche Diabetes Care Manufacturing Facilities

Photo Above: Roche Diabetes Care Manufacturing Facilities

As you can see we accomplished a lot, Roche not only heard from us, they learned from us as well…Or perhaps I should say they learned from you because each of us tries to be a voice for those living with diabetes

Roche supplied each of us with a flash drive to take home that had our group picture on it. It also contained information regarding some of tools that are vital to diabetes management, and that truly impressed me.  However, what impressed me most were the three media releases on the flash drive that recently went out to media and for the world to see.  I have to share them with you:

Roche announces long-term commitment

 to tackle growing epidemic of diabetes

Roche announces wide array of ACCU-CHEK programs centered around Behavior Change through Patient Engagement (SM), including tools for better self-care.

 

Roche, the maker of ACCU-CHEK blood glucose monitoring systems and insulin pumps, announced today its long-term commitment to tackle the growing epidemic of diabetes by its Behavior Change through Patient Engagement (SM) program – a wide array of educational programs and tools that promote more effective self-care.

“As the world leader in diabetes diagnostics, we have a responsibility to provide solutions that overcome a critical gap in diabetes management,” said Head of Roche Diabetes Care North America Luc Vierstraete.  “Traditional diabetes management tends to focus on telling people with diabetes what to do but that, by itself, doesn’t necessarily fully engage patients. Our initiative, Behavior Change through Patient Engagement, is all about helping patients take an active role in their diabetes self-care. We know that keeping patients engaged and focused on self-care is critical to long-term success and better outcomes. We are so committed to this effort, we have already invested more than $14 million toward this initiative and will continue to do so.”

Roche’s Behavior Change through Patient Engagement program offers:

·         Coaching skills for healthcare professionals to help achieve breakthroughs in engagement of patients;

·         Free patient education programs to help adults, children and teens make self-management easier; and

·         Easy tools that help patients discover that the actions they take every day matters – understanding how things like changes in therapy, foods or activities affect their blood glucose.

“Diabetes is a difficult, frustrating disease,” said Roche Diabetes Care Medical Director Dr. Andreas Stuhr. “Our Behavior Change program helps healthcare professionals address things like diabetes burnout and other psychological barriers to effective self-care. In addition, we have devised unique and powerful tools to help patients discover that change is worthwhile and achievable.”

New educational programs and tools within the Behavior Change through Patient Engagement will continue to be rolled out throughout the year. Meanwhile, existing programs have been further enhanced to fully complement the Behavior Change program.

“We are confident that, together, we can change the future of people who have diabetes,’ Vierstraete added. “That core belief – that behavior change is worthwhile and achievable – is essential and Roche is committed to helping provide the foundation needed for lasting change.”

Roche Diabetes Care announces unique coaching program for diabetes educators as part of long-term commitment to fight the disease

Program helps diabetes educators better engage and motivate their patients with the goal of  more positive outcomes.

Roche, the maker of ACCU-CHEK blood glucose monitoring systems and insulin pumps, announced today the latest component of its Behavior Change through Patient Engagement (sm) program.  Creative Coaching is an advanced educational program that fights the growing epidemic of diabetes by improving dialogue between diabetes educators and their patients.

“As the world leader in diabetes diagnostics, we truly appreciate the efforts of educators, and other healthcare professionals, who help their patients lead healthier lifestyles,” said Sr. Vice President & General Manager of Roche Diabetes Care North America Luc Vierstraete.  “They represent the front lines in the fight against poorly managed diabetes and its devastating effects.  These professionals are already so adept at the science of diabetes –  this program helps them with the art of patient engagement.”

Recent participants in the program say they value not only the foundation of adult learning styles and coaching skills, but also the ability to interact with one another while learning how to effectively integrate ACCU-CHEK products and tools.  When educators return to their practices they are better prepared to apply best practices and achieve breakthroughs with their patients.

“What I appreciated most was the purpose of the weekend, which was to increase the quality of our healthcare,”  said Diabetes Educator Linda Filipi, BSN, RN of Laguna Hills, California.  “For us that means how to become better educators – for (Roche) it is how to offer quality products.  The end result is the same: it means that patients live longer, healthier and happier lives.”

Creative Coaching is just one part of the Behavior Change through Patient Engagement program.  Other elements include education to healthcare professionals on psychological barriers to self-care, direct-to-patient education that helps adults, children and teens make self-management easier; and simple, paper-based tools that help patients discover how the actions they take every day matter.

“A worldwide strategic objective for Roche is to ‘Enable Diabetes Management,'” Vierstraete said.  “We take this very seriously – in the U.S. alone we have invested more than $14 million in the overall campaign. By locking arms with these dedicated healthcare professionals and providing them with a forum to improve patient self-care, we feel certain this can be achieved.”

About Roche Diabetes Care

Roche Diabetes Care is a pioneer in the development of blood glucose monitoring systems and a global leader for diabetes management systems and services. For more than 30 years, Roche has been committed to helping people with diabetes live lives that are as normal and active as possible and has been helping healthcare professionals manage their patients’ condition in an optimal way. Today, the ACCU-CHEK portfolio offers people with diabetes and healthcare professionals innovative products, services and comprehensive solutions for convenient, efficient and effective diabetes management-from blood glucose monitoring through information management to insulin delivery. The ACCU-CHEK brand encompasses blood glucose meters, infusion pumps, lancing and data management systems.

For more information, please visit accu-chek.com.

About Roche

Headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, Roche is a leader in research-focused healthcare with combined strengths in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. Roche is the world’s largest biotech company with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, virology, inflammation, metabolism and CNS. Roche is also the world leader in in-vitro diagnostics, tissue-based cancer diagnostics and a pioneer in diabetes management. Roche’s personalized healthcare strategy aims at providing medicines and diagnostic tools that enable tangible improvements in the health, quality of life and survival of patients.

In 2008, Roche had over 80,000 employees worldwide and invested almost 9 billion Swiss francs in R & D. The Group posted sales of 45.6 billion Swiss francs. Genentech (United States) is a wholly owned member of the Roche Group. Roche has a majority stake in Chugai Pharmaceutical (Japan). For more information, visit www.roche-diagnostics.us.

All trademarks used or mentioned in this release are protected by law.

After my visit with Roche, I came home in deep thought. I totally got the summit and what Roche wants to do.  We should all welcome Roche to the world of “Social Media” and I must say kudos to you for what you’ve done, and what I know you are going to be doing, to advance diabetes education:

“We are so committed to this effort, we have already invested more than $14 million toward this initiative and will continue to do so.” That’s just one of the many messages I left the summit reciting over and over.

For everything they’ve done, for me and for the millions living with diabetes, I say thank you to Roche from the bottom of my heart, I know, now I know they know, that education is the answer. I urge you and anyone you know who is or is living with a diabetic, to seek the most important tool we have in our arsenal to fight and live better with this disease… “Diabetes Education”

I leave you with my final thoughts and a quote from Roche’s Dan Kane, Vice President of Marketing in the U.S. for Diabetes Care:

“The main purpose Roche had in organizing this summit was to actively listen, and try to determine how social media could be used to help in the fight against diabetes,” said Vice President of Marketing, Diabetes Care, U.S., Dan Kane.  “As the worldwide leader in diabetes care, we should also lead the way in new technologies that help people lead healthier lives.  Social media is incredibly powerful, and much of it is still uncharted territory.  Together with the bloggers, I think we have taken a very positive first step in discovering how Roche can join the conversation online, and do so in a way that is appropriate, helpful and educational.”

My final thought:

“Roche equals diabetes education for the world!”

Your friend,

Luv, Kitty

Listen to The Latest Broadcast of Diabetes Living Today®

Kitty Broadcast on Roche Diabetes Social Media Summit

The Facts About Diabetes Complications You Should Know

Last modified on 2010-12-24 01:40:51 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Diabetes fact sheet

.

Heart disease and stroke

  • Heart disease and stroke account for about 65% of deaths in people with diabetes.
  • Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about 2 to 4 times higher than adults without diabetes.
  • The risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher and the risk of death from stroke is 2.8 times higher among people with diabetes.

High blood pressure

  • About 73% of adults with diabetes have blood pressure greater than or equal to 130/80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or use prescription medications for hypertension.

Kidney Disease

  • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, accounting for 44% of new cases in 2005.
  • In 2005, 46,739 people with diabetes began treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
  • In 2002, a total of 178,689 people with ESRD due to diabetes were living on chronic dialysis or with a kidney transplant.

Nervous system disease

  • Almost 30% of people with diabetes aged 40 years or older have impaired sensation in the feet (i.e., at least one area that lacks feeling). Diabetic Peripheral Nephropathy
  • Severe forms of diabetic nerve disease are a major contributing cause of lower-extremity amputations.

Amputations

  • More than 60% of nontraumatic lower-limb amputations occur in people with diabetes.
  • In 2004, about 71,000 nontraumatic lower-limb amputations were performed in people with diabetes.
  • The rate of amputation for people with diabetes is 10 times higher than for people without diabetes.

ESRD fact sheet

Anyone can get chronic kidney disease at any age. However, some people are more likely than others to develop kidney disease. You may have an increased risk for kidney disease if you:

  • Have diabetes
  • Have high blood pressure
  • Have a family history of chronic kidney disease
  • Are older
  • belong to a population group that has a high rate of diabetes or high blood pressure, such as African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asians, Pacific Islanders and American Indians
  • 23% of ESRD patients are estimated to also have PAD

PAD fact sheet

Peripheral arterial disease (P.A.D.) affects 8 to 12 million people in the United States. African Americans are more than twice as likely as Caucasians to have P.A.D. The major risk factors for P.A.D. are smoking, age, and having certain diseases or conditions.

Smoking:        

Smoking is more closely related to getting P.A.D. than any other risk factor. Your risk for P.A.D. increases four times if you smoke or have a history of smoking. On average, smokers who develop P.A.D. have symptoms 10 years earlier than nonsmokers who develop P.A.D.

Age:    

As you get older, your risk for P.A.D. increases. Genetic or lifestyle factors cause plaque to build in your arteries as you age. About 5 percent of U.S. adults who are older than 50 have P.A.D. Among adults aged 65 and older, 12 to 20 percent may have P.A.D. Older age combined with other risk factors, such as smoking or diabetes, also puts you at higher risk.

Diseases and Conditions

A number of diseases and conditions can raise your risk for P.A.D. These include:

  • Diabetes. One in three people who has diabetes and is older than 50 is likely to have P.A.D.
  • High blood pressure or a family history of it.
  • High blood cholesterol or a family history of it.
  • Heart disease or a family history of it.
  • Stroke or a family history of it.

No Sugar Added™

Last modified on 2009-03-04 21:53:54 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Welcome to Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar AddedTM Blog.  Here you can read writing by Kitty Castellini of what it was like for her to live with type 1 diabetes for over 40 years  and her battle to find a cure through a successful “Pancreas Transplant Alone.”  Kitty will also share with her readers what life is like today to be “insulin~free.”  Follow Kitty as she travels to interview “World Class” Research Scientist to learn about cure-focus research.

No Sugar AddedTM Blog will also feature, “Exclusive Guest Post” by many known Authors.  Here you will find that things are not “sugar coated!” We invite to join our blogs with your comments and to also submit your writing for publication.

What You Really Need to Know about Exercise and Diabetes. By Sheri Colberg, Ph.D.

Last modified on 2010-12-24 01:56:05 GMT. 1 comment. Top.

 Diabetes Living Today presents an “exclusive guest post” written by Dr. Sheri Colberg for our reader’s:

What You Really Need to Know about Exercise and Diabetes

By Sheri Colberg, Ph.D.

Even though I have personally been living with diabetes since I was four years old (in 1968), I knew even back then-more than a decade before the era of home blood glucose monitoring began-that exercise did good things for my blood sugars.  How could I tell without a blood glucose meter?  Mainly I knew because being active always made me feel better, physically and emotionally, in ways that nothing else could.  In fact, as I went through my teenage years without any way to know what my blood sugars were, exercising regularly gave me the only sense of control that I had over my diabetes.  There are some things that I know now about exercise that I wish someone had told me years ago.  Luckily, times have changed, and you have access to information now about exercise and diabetes (any type) that I did not.

For starters, did you know that exercise can virtually erase your blood sugar mistakes?  I knew it helped me, but it wasn’t until I got my first monitor in the mid-1980s that I found out how much.  Why?  Exercise acts as an extra dose of insulin by getting the sugar out of your blood and into your muscles without insulin (through an insulin-independent mechanism related to muscle contractions themselves).  When you’re not being active, your body needs insulin to stimulate that uptake.  Being regularly active makes your muscles more sensitive to any insulin in your body as well, so it takes less to get the job done.  What better way to help erase a little overeating of carbs (or a slight lack of insulin or insulin resistance) than a moderate dose of exercise to lower your blood sugar?

Something else I wish I’d known is that exercise doesn’t always make your blood sugar come down, at least not right away.  When you do really intense exercise, the glucose-raising hormones that your body releases (like adrenaline and glucagon) can actually raise your blood sugar somewhat instead, albeit usually only temporarily.  This phenomenon in true for people with type 1, type 1.5, type 2, and gestational diabetes, and even for anyone without diabetes.  However, even if a workout raises it in the short run, over a longer period of time (2-3 hours), the residual effects of the exercise will bring your blood sugar back down while you’re replacing the carbs in your muscles that you used.  If you take insulin, be careful to take less than normal to correct a post-workout high or your blood sugar will likely be crashing low a few hours later.  If you don’t take insulin, just give it some time to come back down or do a cool-down of less intense exercise (like less-than-brisk walking) to help bring it back to normal.

Another thing to know is that how much muscle you have really makes a big difference.  Exercise helps you build and retain your muscle mass, which is the main place you store carbs after you eat them.  Almost any type of exercise uses up some of those stores-known as muscle glycogen-but if you don’t exercise regularly, your muscles remain packed with it.  There is a maximal amount that fits in muscles, which is why building up your muscle mass helps with being able to handle the carbs you eat more effectively.  Your liver stores some glucose as glycogen, but not that much relative to your muscles’ total storage capacity.  Thus, being sedentary ensures that no amount of insulin is going to be able stimulate more blood glucose uptake into your muscles.  Without regular exercise to use up some of that glycogen, you really have nowhere to store carbs, so your blood sugars go up and some of the excess gets turned into body fat instead (since still works to stimulate fat storage even when your muscles are insulin resistant).  You can’t lose body fat if your insulin levels are high (or you take large doses).  Having more muscle-which is an insulin sensitive body tissue-is definitely a good thing, but something you have to work at since aging causes you to lose the muscle fibers you don’t use regularly.  Doing resistance or weight training is critical to maintaining the muscle mass you have and offsetting the effects of getting older as much as possible.

I have an even longer list of all the things I wish I had known about exercise and diabetes, but let me share just a few more tidbits with you to whet your appetite for more.  Exercise is probably the best way to control emotional stress and to stave off depression-far better than antidepressant medications and with no bad side-effects!  What’s more, exercise naturally bestows your body with antioxidant effect, which is why regular exercisers are less likely to develop most types of cancer; why they generally feel and act younger than their chronological age; why they’re less likely to even get a cold if doing moderate amounts of regular exercise; and why exercise is about the best medicine that there is for so many other health conditions (so don’t forget to take your daily dose).  Finally, there are many different ways to exercise, including standing up more, taking extra steps during the day, fidgeting, and just generally being on the move whenever and wherever possible.  Knowing that hopefully takes away all of your excuses for not being more active.  If you can’t get in a “planned” workout on any given day, you can certainly add in more steps or other activity all day long instead (or do it in addition to your usual exercise).  Every bit of movement you do during the day counts, so fidget away!

If you need motivation or tips for getting started on an exercise program, check out my book entitled The 7 Step Diabetes Fitness Plan.  For people with any type of diabetes who are already more active but want more in-depth information, my latest book released in November 2008, Diabetic Athlete’s Handbook, is for you; it’s packed with good information for type 1 and type 2 exercisers, along with real-life athlete examples, athlete profiles, and over 100 sports and recreational activities.  For inspiration about living long and well with diabetes, consider reading 50 Secrets of the Longest Living People with Diabetes.  For all sorts of other tips on exercise, fitness, diabetes, nutrition, and more, please visit my Web site and exercise blog at www.shericolberg.com

Photo Above: Dr. Sheri Colberg

 

Call Me Patient, Not Consumer

Last modified on 2009-05-16 21:04:38 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Diabetes Living Today is happy to have our friend Manny Hernandes, co-founder of TuDiabetes.  Manny has written an “exclusive guest post for our reader’s: 

Call Me Patient, Not Consumer

(or why trust is key for Health 2.0 to continue to make progress)Last year, I had the honor to present TuDiabetes at Health2.0 2008 in San Francisco (http://tudiabetes.com/video/tudiabetes-at-health-20-2008). The conference dealt with empowering patients through support, tools and information to help them better manage their health.You would imagine that technologies and platforms for patient empowerment would have patients at the center. And they do to a great degree, except for the fact that patients were routinely referred to as consumers, not as patients, throughout the conference. Most of the people I pointed this out to didn’t notice it. Some didn’t think it was an issue.So, is it a big deal that patients are called consumers? It is if you THINK of them as consumers first and patients second. That puts a bigger emphasis on how much profit the patient can make a company, which can lead to less-than-optimal decisions on behalf of the patient later on.There is nothing wrong with profits resulting from offering products or services to patients to help them improve their health. But this is a case where the order of the factors affects the final result. If this sounds to you like an extreme view, consider your own experience when dealing with insurance companies (http://tudiabetes.com/forum/topics/health-insurance-social).What does this patient and consumer talk have to do with diabetes? As one of the most common chronic diseases, I want to see diabetes turn into an example of the direction Health 2.0 will take, with patient health improvement as the most important goal.

Support

Healthier lives result from connections with other patients: people you not only can relate to but people that you trust. Clay Shirky, author of the book, “Here Comes Everybody” puts it in very clear terms: “… whenever people decide to trust one another, information will flow.”This is why one of the fastest growing areas in Health 2.0 has to do with patient communities. Networks like TuDiabetes and DiabetesDaily (structured spaces where patients get support from others they trust) and slightly more organic networks, like Twitter , where patients share what they do with their diabetes management in 140 characters or less are very good examples of this trend. You can join the growing number of Twitter users with diabetes at: http://tudiabetes.com/group/twitterbeticsIn 2009, networks and platforms that keep on improving the channels for patients to support each other will continue to grow and positively impact the lives and health of many more.

Tools

In the course of 2008 there was a lot of talk in Health 2.0 circles about electronic Personal Health Records. Microsoft took a stab at them with HealthVault. Google tried to tackle them through Google Health . A lot remains to be done, but with the emphasis placed by the new administration on health care and PHRs specifically, I would not be surprised if we see important progress in this front in 2009.If the element of trust is important in the case of support networks, it becomes critical in the case of tools like these. Before people feel comfortable letting their health information reside online, important progress needs to be made to make everyone comfortable with this idea. This is an area where treating the patient as a patient and not a consumer is fundamental as well.

Information

Google, WebMD, HealthLine, RightHealth, OrganizedWisdom, HealthLibrarian. There are tons of resources: from the generic search engines to the specific sites that focus on health. This makes life for patients searching for information about their symptoms or disease harder than necessary.Sure it’s easy to find information, but is it the answer to your specific question? Is it reliable? Is it raw information or has it been edited? Who gets to edit it and why? So many questions come up that patients commonly resort to support communities to post their questions when they feel overwhelmed or they simply cannot trust the information they have found.These kinds of online queries cannot substitute asking a medical professional. But between appointments, resources that can be trusted to answer important questions need to be available. In 2009, I foresee support networks stepping up to the plate to start filling this need through content vetted by medical professionals. Along with this, the concept of virtual visits (also called e-visits to the doctor) will continue to pick up steam throughout the year and into 2010.

Patients First

There is no doubt: the health space has changed and it is not going back. If anything it’s going to keep changing. I hope the changes will be for the better, but considering how much more empowered patients are becoming, I feel this will be the case.Now, through our blogs, communities and the diabetes OC at large, we need to work hard to make the promise of Health 2.0 available to everyone. Until then, to all providers: please don’t call me consumer. Call me patient.

Why I Blog by Kerri Morrone Sparling

Last modified on 2008-12-30 12:42:25 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Diabetes Living Today is happy to have our friend Kerri Morrone Sparling as our guest tonight, Tuesday December 30, 2008.  She has written an “exclusive guest post“, Why I Blog for our reader’s.

Why I Blog

Kerri Morrone Sparling

The human body is absolutely amazing in the way each organ works together with such precision, maintaining our homeostasis and keeping us kicking.

But the mind of a diabetic is pretty amazing, too. We have trained our minds to think like a pancreas. We are the people who know how many carbs are floating around in a bowl of cereal. We are the ones who can take a blood sugar number and fold it into any situation – 140 mg/dl on the soccer field means more orange slices while 140 mg/dl at the dinner table means correcting the high and navigating the meal. We are the ones who are trying to compensate for some cells that simply gave out on us. Crawling inside the thoughts of a working pancreas and trying to mimic its performance is not an easy task.

When I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1986, my parents and I were instructed how to inject insulin into oranges, handed a generic meal plan, and given a “Bill Nye the Science Guy” test tube set to check my urine glucose. Over the course of the last two decades, I have seen remarkable advancements in diabetes technology, from fast-acting insulins like Humalog and 5 second glucose meters to insulin pump therapy and continuous glucose monitoring systems.

But despite this influx of information and technology, I was still one of the only diabetics I knew, completely loved but not completely understood by my friends and family. I didn’t feel sick. I felt frustrated. And alone. I have had diabetes for most of my life, so by necessity I knew the technical essentials. But where were all the people who were living with this disease, like I have been since I was small?

When I first researched diabetes on Google, the page filled with a litany of links and lists of ways I could become “complicated,” urging me to take fastidious care of my feet, to schedule annual eye exams, and discussing the benefits of testing my blood sugar at least four times per day. It wasn’t that this information was useless to me, but it was mostly clinical statistics and besides, who were these people writing this stuff?

At the recommendation of my now-husband, I started a blog called Six Until Me, referring to my age when the first signs of diabetes presented themselves. Six years until diabetes – six until me. How it touches every day life, from the spotty scars on my fingertips to the dots of past infusion sets on my thighs that tell a silent story.

Blogging has changed my perception of diabetes from one of loneliness to being embraced by a network of support. It’s about sharing these feelings and forcing me to deal with these emotions, keeping diabetes from being an isolating force in my life. In addition, what started as a means of connecting with other diabetics ultimately grew into a terrific career as an editor and columnist at dLife, where I see daily the profound and empowering effects of a strong and empowered community.

Every day we, as people with diabetes or their caregivers, face this disease. And every day is easier knowing there are people out there who understand completely.

This is why I blog.

 

Photo Above:  Kerri Morrone Sparling

Kerri Sparling writes the widely-read and award-winning diabetes blog Six Until Me, about her life as a twenty something with type 1 diabetes. In addition to her blog, she is also an Editor and columnist for dLife, and a columnist for several diabetes publications. Recently married, Kerri currently lives in Connecticut with her husband and their army of cats.

The DRI Diabetes 2.0 Update in New York City

Last modified on 2009-07-29 21:07:15 GMT. 1 comment. Top.

New York City again! Yes, it was my second trip back to a beautiful city that I hope to one day get to explore. Dr. Fallon and I drove up very early in the morning, leaving his office around 5:30am to attend the Diabetes Research Institute Diabetes 2.0 Update.

The day started off as the elevator doors open and there was Bob Pearlman, President of The DRIF. It was such a pleasure to see him again, the three of us had a nice visit before the day got started. It was so nice to see many of the family as I refer to the outstanding group from Miami. We got to visit with Gary Kleiman and finally meet his brother Glenn Kleiman, the voice behind the DRI Minute, which can be heard on our show each week. Lori Weintraub and I finally got to meet after working with each other for several years. Yes, I did get my hug from Dr. Camillo Ricordi and I have to say he looks pretty darn handsome! Wow, he just looks great, as he has just recently lost 40lbs… Way to go Camillo!

The day was just outstanding to all who attended. Many Scientist from around the world and guest speakers were in attendance giving talks throughout the day.

The State of Diabetes Research: A Global View, by Dr. Camillo Ricordi

The start of the 21st. century brought with it technical innovations and unprecedented opportunities that have already begun to revolutionize medical research. Powerful new tools are enabling physicians and scientist to combine engineering principles and nano-scale technology with biology to develop new ways to treat and cure diseases.

In his talk, Dr. Camillo Ricordi provided an overview of a new roadmap in cure-focused diabetes research – uniting leading investigators around the world to focus on several key research areas, including:

  • Tissue engineering to better protect transplanted cells and tissue
  • Exploring novel strategies to harness the enormous potential of adult and embryonic stem cells, to develop:
  1. A limitless supply of insulin-producing cells
  2. Cells capable of promoting cell survival
  3. Cells able to re-educate the immune system, so it would accept transplanted cells
  • The ability to promote islet regeneration in the native pancreas

Dr. Ricordi also reviewed the results of recent islet transplant studies conducted worldwide and explained how the emerging technologies are being applied to cell replacement strategies aimed at restoring natural insulin production in those living with diabetes.

Dr. Fallon and I enjoyed our day, as it was filled with so much information. During lunch we enjoyed a Panel Presentation; Research News: Hype or Hope? The Panelists of experts included: Moderator, Amy Tenderich, DiabetesMine.com, Jeff Hitchcock, Founder and President, Children With Diabetes, Fran Carpentier, Parade.com, Dr.Jay Skyler, DRI, Dr. Norma S. Kenyon,DRI, Dr. Wendy Satin Rapaport,DRI,

 

The DRI Diabetes 2.0 Update in New York City

Last modified on 2008-11-05 15:16:08 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

 
 
Harnessing New Technologies in Research and Treatment  
CLICK TO WATCH VIDEOS
 
 
 
 
Top scientists, psychologists and experts from around the blogo-sphere shared the latest in diabetes research, treatment and more last Saturday at “Diabetes 2.0,” the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation’s seventh New York Research Update.
 
Now, you can see what happened by watching videos on the DRI’s website.
 
Among the topics covered:

  • What’s next in diabetes research and treatment?
  • What’s available now?
  • Is it hype — or hope?
Learn how researchers are harnessing emerging technologies to benefit those with type 1 diabetes. Find out what tools and treatments are available now and what’s in the pipeline. And, gain a new perspective on the progress you hear about in the media.
 
WATCH THE VIDEOS NOW
 
Also, find out:

  • Can type 1 diabetes be prevented?
  • What’s new with stem cells?
  • How to live an active, healthy lifestyle
 
http://cl.exct.net/?ju=fe201671776c0c7a731d74&ls=fde8127773670c747315707c&m=fefc1671766203&l=fe5d1575746d037a7615&s=fdf515747060077c7d11727c&jb=ffcf14&t=
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Event generously underwritten by:
Bonnie Inserra and Larry Inserra
 
Co-chairs:
Carolyn and Marc Goldfarb, Fran and John Luebs
  http://cl.exct.net/?ju=fe1f1671776c0c7a731d75&ls=fde8127773670c747315707c&m=fefc1671766203&l=fe5d1575746d037a7615&s=fdf515747060077c7d11727c&jb=ffcf14&t=

“Bare Foot In New York City”

Last modified on 2008-05-31 11:54:45 GMT. 1 comment. Top.

Hi Everyone!  Sorry it has been a while since I’ve wrote to all of you, I’ve been very busy and hey if you guys think it’s easy to keep with up the Rockin’ Doc’  (Dr. Fallon) I can tell you it’s NOT!  At least not in New York City, we recently went to NY City to attend the DREAMS IN THE CITY for the Diabetes Research Institute.  It was a wonderful evening for all who attended.  Oh and it was my very time ever going to NY City, so I am sure you could only imagine my excitement!

What I learned on my very first trip:  Never wear “High Heels” to NY City, and I mean never!  The train ride to NY was very exciting as I was wondering if it would be like what I had seen on TV?  It was, as we arrived at Penn Station and exited the train there were people everywhere, this is where the fun begins.  As we approached the street level is when the heal on my right shoe decided to break, it was loose.  As my mind started to race around…I thought oh no, this did not just happen!  I thought well Kitty your going to get through this night just fine.

The evening was spectacular as I was so excited for Dr. Fallon to finally get to meet so many wonderful people who flew up from The Diabetes Research Institute in Miami to attend the event.   The event brought in One Million dollars to fund a cure!  For more information on this event and to view photos click here !

I would like to know why is it that a man will not stop and ask for directions???  Women we have all been there!  Yes, as we left the event.  I had no choice except to take off my high heels to keep from breaking my ankle,  there we were me and the Rockin’ Doc’ leaving NY City with me walking bare stocking feet!  As we approached the train station to head back home, it dawned on me that Dr. Fallon was heading towards the wrong train…as I gently asked him if this was right he kept going, so I followed.  Oh this is the wonderful part.  We board the train, I closely watch Dr. Fallon’s expression as he was not saying a word.  We take our seat and as the train starts to pull away….I leaned over and asked…Dr., are we on the right train?  He responded with a look of wonder, as he replied,  Kitty I’m not sure, but I don’t think so!  Yes, we were on the wrong train heading the wrong way!!!!  We had to loop back to Penn Station to get the right train home!

I had such a wonderful time in NY City and am looking forward to going back.  Yes, I  already have one of many trips planned.  I am already making plans with Robert A. Pearlman, to meet in NY City.   Robert A. Pearlman is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation (DRIF).  Click here to read more about Robert A. Pearlman

Photo Above:  Mr. Robert A. Pearlman & Kitty Castellini 

 

 

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A Prayer For Hillary

Last modified on 2012-03-29 15:54:14 GMT. 1 comment. Top.

This morning I went to a breakfast to help support a young 10 year old young child that is need of a bone marrow transplant. Hillary has a rare childhood cancer called Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. It was a pleasure to meet this young lady this morning, as we talked she shared with me that she goes to Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia (CHOP) sometimes weekly. I shared with her that as a child I to had spent time at CHOP and assured her that she was in good hands. As her loving Grand~Father Pete looked over her shoulder’s she shared with me that she is brave! Her olive skin, beautiful brown eye’s and hair just seemed to glow, her beautiful smile was beautiful. You could see her dreams in her eyes. I gave her a hug and shared with her that I was a transplant patient and would continue to keep her in my Prayer’s.

Life’s Wonders

Last modified on 2012-03-29 15:40:06 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

The things we see before our eyes can truly stimulate ones brain to think. Last night Dr. Fallon and I did a “live broadcast” from the Mutter Museum in Philadelphia, PA. It was amazing to see where medicine has come from, where it is today and what is ahead for those in the Medical field.

We had the opportunity to take a private tour with The Camden County Medical Society. It was such an honor to be with this group of wonderful Physicians. I quietly observed each exhibit, not straying to far from my trusting Dr. He would have been the one that I would have turned to had I wanted to understand something better.

Things were going well; my eyes would become enlarged as I would slowly look at what is front of them. Phil Cinelli would comment on the different exhibits to me as he to was amazed. Yes, we saw the Worlds largest colon, Siamese twins, the Worlds smallest brain among many things.

As the tour guide made her way through the tour we came upon The Soap Lady. Now let me tell you that was the most horrific thing that I had ever seen in my entire life. I watched Dr. Fallon & Phil look inside the glass tomb. I slowly approached the tomb…I saw her feet, my stomach starting to turn, my body became flushed. I was in total disbelief what was lying there. I was determined to look, as I wanted to see just how far medicine has come, what they can learn from this specimen. As I slowly looked at her entire body, it became very clear to me that I soon would be getting sick, I slowly walked away from her and the entire group. Breathe, I would tell myself…just breathe Kitty.

I give to you: The Soap Lady:

(Photo property of www.roadsideamerica.com)

Back Home Again

Last modified on 2012-03-29 15:37:30 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Hi Everyone! I am home from Miami. What an exciting time that I had. Many of you have read my writings in the past. Today again I shall shed my soul to help others to understand. Diabetes…we have heard of it, some of us live with it. I have been “cured” from it! “We need a cure now, Insulin is not a cure!

As I walked through those doors at The Diabetes Research Institute at The University of Miami it was like going home! The DRI is truly family! Work is being done there around the clock to find a cure. I was so excited to see everyone! However inside my heart shed a tear. Again I was walking through those doors for all of you, to be your voice! I wanted to scream out loud that I want all diabetics to be able to experience what I am…. CURED! It is coming, it will come from the DRI. Someday I hope for Dr. Fallon to walk through those doors at the DRI. I know he will someday!

I was greeted by Gary Kleiman, the executive director. I have to tell you the first time we met was like seeing an old friend. Our day was delayed due to a major power outage that put most of Florida out. We went out to grab a bite to eat and catch up on the past year! Gary is also a type one diabetic, he has had two kidney transplants, one of the first at the DRI to receive islet cells. Like myself Gary suffers from diabetic eye disease. I fell in love with his computer monitor. That is just what I myself need. I am sure it will make a big difference. I truly admire Gary’s determination and wonderful spirit. We share a bond of diabetes and it’s complications, both of us are immounosuppressed. Our main bond is the fact that we both engage the fight for life, determined to outlive our destiny … now to help others to understand. Gary is also the author of; “No Time To Lose.”

Photo Above: Research Scientist Dr. Cherie Stabler, DRI Executive Director Gary Kleiman & Kitty

Photo Above:  Islet Cells, yes taken with my own camera!

Photo Above:  The Ricordi Chamber

Photo Above:  Mouse Model (no harm is done to testing models)

Photo Above:  Stem Cells

We had a wonderful broadcast live from Miami that evening with Dr. Fallon in the Vineland Studio. Joining him was Dr. Nasser I. Youssef, Transplant Surgeon from Our Lady of Lourdes Health System in Camden, NJ. Joining us in Miami live from the DRI, Dr. Cherie Stabler, Dr. Tatiana Froud and “World Class” Research Scientist Dr. Camillo Ricordi.

Photo Above: Dr. Camillo Ricordi, Kitty, Dr. Cherie Stabler and Dr. Tatiana Froud

After the broadcast Dr. Ricordi and I shared a Reese’s! It was such a pleasure to have all of them as guest on Diabetes Living Today and to spend time with Dr. Ricordi again. I look forward to going back home!

Photo Above: Kitty, the “Cured” type 1 diabetic with “World Class” Research Scientist & “Friend” Dr. Ricordi

A big Thank You to my family at the DRI. Keep working towards the Cure.

Insulin Is Not a Cure! Luv, kitty

Sunshine On My Shoulders

Last modified on 2008-04-01 22:21:56 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

So I want everyone to know that I had a great flight down to Miami, it is 90 here today, a big change from my home in NJ. I spent lastnight with my dear daughter touring this beautiful place. I am getting ready to head over to the DRI where I will spend the day with Executive Director Gary Kleiman. He will take me back into the labs today, It is something to see, yes I am looking forward to holding and seeing those islet cells again! Yes, I have my camera ready. I am also looking forward to seeing all of the Research Scientist, I’ve packed Reese’s Cup for all of them!!! I am just so excited about tonight to interview Dr. Camillo Ricordi, but mostly to see him again! He is an awesome down to earth man! I wish Dr. Fallon was here with me, I keep telling him that he is going to have to take a visit down here. Time is moving on and with that I must to get moving. I hope all of you listen tonight.

Big Hugs, kitty

Leaving, On A Jet Plane

Last modified on 2009-06-04 11:28:15 GMT. 2 comments. Top.

Hello World,

I’d like to welcome you to Diabetes Living Today’s first blog. I am so very excited for tomorrow as I will be boarding a plane that will take me to The Diabetes Research Institute at The University of Miami to interview Dr. Camillo Ricordi for the second time within the year. I have packed my bags and the limo is around the bend. This is a place that is working non-stop, around the clock to find a cure for Diabetes. I will be there again this week…. I call it going home! I invite you to join me this week as I update “live” reports from the DRI.

hugs, kitty