New effort to fight diabetes in Sonoma County

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Sonoma County medical providers are taking aggressive steps to deal with the high rate of patients with diabetes admitted to local hospitals, a trend that is said to be driving up hospital costs.

In Sonoma County, patients with diabetes account for almost 26 percent of all local hospital admissions, according to a recent UCLA analysis of 2011 hospital patient discharge data. That’s a total of 7,459 hospital admissions.

The added cost of hospital care is estimated at $16.4 million, according to the study, which was conducted by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research with support from the California Center for Public Health Advocacy.

“We are very concerned about the epidemic of diabetes and the toll that it takes on individuals and the system that cares for them,” said Karen Holbrook, the county’s deputy public health officer.

Holbrook said diabetic patients who are admitted to local hospitals pose more medical complications than those who are not diabetic and often require more tests and treatments. Severe diabetes often results in serious medical conditions such as liver disease and kidney failure, she said.

According to the UCLA study, 31 percent of the state’s hospitalized patients 35 years or older, the age group that accounts for most hospitalizations, had diabetes. The study estimated that the added cost to hospitals in California was $1.6 billion. Hospital stays for diabetic patients in the state cost an average of $2,200 more than for non-diabetic patients, according to the study.

The study’s authors pointed out that 75 percent of this care is covered by Medicare and Medi-Cal, the state’s Medicaid program. Medi-Cal alone pays $254 million in added costs for diabetic patients.

The Tour de Cure event hosted by the American Diabetes Association of Northeast Ohio has already raised $250,000 for diabetes research

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CUYAHOGA FALLS — The Tour de Cure event hosted by the American Diabetes Association of Northeast Ohio has already raised $250,000 for diabetes research in the region, according to Melissa Sutton, the event manager.

The annual event leads riders through a bike route as long as 100 miles. However, riders could also bike shorter distances.

The Saturday ride kicked off at the Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy on Wyoga Lake Rd. in Cuyahoga Falls.

Participants could also enjoy on-site activities geared towards fun and information about diabetes.

Sutton, who has lived with type one diabetes since she was 9-years-old, says she hopes the ride will combat the stigma the disease faces. “My pancreas stopped working and there’s not a darn thing I can do about it,” Sutton tells Channel 3’s Hilary Golston. “It stops working. So I take it particularly personally when people think it’s a lifestyle disease.”

According to the ADA, 330,000 people have diabetes in Northeast Ohio. “Red riders” or those living with the disease donned red shirts to denote they have diabetes and are participating in the race.

Riders were asked to raise at least $200 to participate, but some raised much more. 11-year-old Gabe Grizwald was able to rake in $2,000. He’s also living with type one diabetes. “I ride for diabetes because it’s just a horrible disease to have and it’s really just changed my life and I think it helps so much when people ride for us and raise money and it really could lead to a cure,” Grizwald tells Golston.

Brian Travalik is Tour de Cure’s red rider ambassador. Decked out in a tutu for flare, he not only lives with diabetes, but represents the so-called “red riders.” Red riders are those who have diabetes and are also participating in Tour de Cure. “It’s a chance to be honored as a hero,” Travalik said. “To see other people with diabetes, it’s a good feeling to be around that comradery of other people that are dealing with that same disease.”

It’s not too late to donate to the cause. You can head over to http://main.diabetes.org/site/TR?fr_id=9375&pg=pfind to give.

 

‘Inadequate’ NHS diabetes care causing patients ‘harm’ By Mike Tighe

People with diabetes need to check their blood sugar levels.

NHS diabetes care is ‘inadequate’ and some patients come to further harm due to poor care in hospital, a leading specialist says.

Dr Gerry Rayman, national clinical lead for inpatient diabetes, warned many hospitals had no specialist diabetes nurse.

He said many hospital patients had diabetes, and called the situation ‘quite alarming’.

The Department of Health said work was under way to improve care standards.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s You and Yours, Dr Rayman, head of the diabetes service at Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, said: “We know that one in three hospitals don’t have a specialist diabetes nurse, which is really quite alarming when we know that one in six people in hospital have diabetes.

“Unfortunately, many people in hospital with diabetes do come to harm as a result of, I’m afraid to say, inadequate care in hospital.”

Diabetes accounts for 11% of all NHS inpatient expenditure, and costs the service around £23.7bn last year, a figure projected to increase to just under £40bn by 2035.

Two types

Diabetes complications

  • Diabetes that is not controlled can cause many serious long-term problems.
  • Excess glucose (sugar) in the blood can damage the blood vessels, contributing to heart disease, strokes, kidney disease, impotence and nerve damage.
  • Uncontrolled diabetes is the most common cause of blindness in people of working age.
  • People with diabetes are also 15% more likely to have an amputation than people without the condition.

In Type 2 diabetes, not enough insulin is produced or the insulin that is made by the body does not work properly.

It tends to affect people as they get older and usually appears after the age of 40, but increasingly is seen in younger, overweight people. It accounts for 90% of all cases.

Type 1 diabetes, a condition which usually means insulin cannot be produced at all, is responsible for the other 10%.

Adrian Sanders, chair of the all-party parliamentary group for diabetes, claimed there was plenty of evidence out there to support Dr Rayman’s assessment.

He said the government was aware that a disproportionate number of people occupying hospital beds have diabetes, and their hospital stays are longer.

He said the government – and the last Labour administration – had encouraged more support for people with diabetes in primary care.

“That’s actually a very good policy for people whose condition doesn’t present complications or specialisms. And that’s why you need specialist care for those who present with specialist problems.”

Barbara Young, chief executive at Diabetes UK, said diabetes was a serious condition which could lead to devastating long term complications including blindness, kidney failure and amputations.

She said: “The tragedy is that for many people with diabetes, complications could have been avoided if the health checks were in place to spot any signs and if the appropriate care and treatment were applied.

“For example, up to 80% of amputation cases due to diabetes could be avoided if problems are identified early enough and treated appropriately.”

Personal responsibility

A key area of contention is whether diabetes is an issue for social or personal responsibility, with some arguing for tougher regulation of the food industry, whilst others argue healthy diet is strictly a matter for the individual.

Last week a ten-minute rule bill was introduced in the House of Commons by Keith Vaz arguing for the reduction of sugar content in soft drinks by 4%.

However, Paul McArdle, of the British Dietetic Association, cautioned against putting too much emphasis on sugar in food.

He said: “Food labelled ‘suitable for diabetics’ comes from the misguided principal that everything for people with diabetes is about sugar.

“The main focus for this group is losing weight and having a healthy diet, as this helps people with diabetes manage the condition.

“Around 60-90% of type two diabetes is caused by people being overweight, with more than half of that being preventable by having a healthy lifestyle.

“The bigger issue is good food labelling which can enable consumers of food to make healthy choices.”

Audit for improvement

The Department of Health issued a statement which accepted that good diabetes care was very important in hospital – and elsewhere.

“That is why the National Diabetes Inpatient Audit reviews diabetes management in hospital each year and feeds results back to individual hospitals to take appropriate action.

“NHS Diabetes is working with clinicians through their Inpatient Network to improve care.

“The Audit has already shown some improvements in care but more needs to be done.”

May 1, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

 

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® :

May 1, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

 


March 27, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® No Sugar Added® with Dr. John Mazzochette, Psychiatrist. Diabetes and Depression.

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

 

Dr. John Mazzochette

Dr. Mazzochette is a psychiatrist with a private practice in Cherry Hill, NJ. He is chief of psychiatry section at Virtua Hospital in Voorhees, NJ and staff psychiatrist at Ancora Psychiatrist Hospital in Ancora, NJ. His interests include post-traumatic stress disorder and cross-cultural psychiatry. He is fellowship trained in cross-cultural psychiatry.

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® interview:

March 27, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® No Sugar Added® with Dr. John Mazzochette, Psychiatrist. Diabetes and Depression.

March 14, 2012 ~ Dr. Leonard Krivy Talks about Diabetes and Transplantation

Dr. Leonard Krivy is a nationally recognized educational consultant, author, broadcaster and newspaper columnist.  In his distinguished career, he’s been a teacher, career counselor, college dean, Director of Philadelphia’s Commission on Higher Education, Executive Director of the College of Allied Health Professions at Hahnemann Medical College, consultant and advisor on education to colleges, labor industry and government.

In recent years he has concentrated on individual counseling; specializing in guiding students to and through college; graduate and professional schools.

He offers unique expertise: detailed first-hand knowledge of educational systems and institutions; developed skills in advanced placement and counseling; and understanding of and an affinity for young people – a combination that affords and unduplicated personalized service.

Over the years, I’ve answered your questions on Schools and Schooling on CBS radio and in my newspaper columns.  I’ve met with numbers of you in my private educational counseling practice, where I specialize in high school; college, graduate and professional school advisement and placement, and in educational and vocational testing.  I also provide complete expert and confidential financial aid counseling for college, graduate and professional school.

For information on the wide range of educational and career planning services offered, or for an appointment, please call

Remember the right guidance is of lifelong importance.  I look forward to helping you.

1765 Fireside Lane
Cherry Hill, NJ  08003

Cherry Hill 856/428-1282
Philadelphia 215/545-1555

FAX 856/428-6910

Email: lpkphd@aol.com

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

March 14, 2012 ~ Dr. Leonard Krivy Talks about Diabetes and Transplantation


March 13, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar

 

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

March 13, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~  No Sugar Added® Open Forum

March 6, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

 

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

March 6, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® No Sugar Added® Open Forum

February 28, 2012 ~ Dr. Joseph M. Kiernan, Cardiologist

Joseph M. Kiernan MD, FACC, FSCAI

Dr. Joseph Kiernan has a private practice with the Cardiovascular Group in Northern Virginia and is the co-director for the Coronary Care Unit at Inova Fairfax Hospital.  Fairfax Hospital has 11 catheterization  labs and one of the largest cath volumes on the east coast. Dr. Kiernan is Board Certified in Cardiology & Interventional Cardiology. His cardiovascular Group’s mission is to make a difference in the community by providing extraordinary cardiovascular care.

A physician-patient relationship is based on  mutual trust is Dr. Kiernan’s belief.

Dr. Kiernan is a graduate of the  Medical College  of Virginia. He completed his internal medicine and cardiology training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.  He is a  FELLOW, American College of Cardiology and Fellow of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. He is a member and the American Medical Association.

Dr.Joseph Kiernan is married to Dr. Sharon Kiernan who is the Chief of Neonatal Medicine and Medical Director of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Holy Cross Hospital in Siver Spring,  Maryland.

Dr. Sharon Kiernan believes in neonatal survivorship, but not germs.  Drs. Sharon and Joe live with two Shelties.

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

February 28, 2012 ~ Dr. Joseph M. Kiernan, Cardiologist

February 7, 2012 Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

 

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

February 7, 2012: Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum