New effort to fight diabetes in Sonoma County

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Sonoma County medical providers are taking aggressive steps to deal with the high rate of patients with diabetes admitted to local hospitals, a trend that is said to be driving up hospital costs.

In Sonoma County, patients with diabetes account for almost 26 percent of all local hospital admissions, according to a recent UCLA analysis of 2011 hospital patient discharge data. That’s a total of 7,459 hospital admissions.

The added cost of hospital care is estimated at $16.4 million, according to the study, which was conducted by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research with support from the California Center for Public Health Advocacy.

“We are very concerned about the epidemic of diabetes and the toll that it takes on individuals and the system that cares for them,” said Karen Holbrook, the county’s deputy public health officer.

Holbrook said diabetic patients who are admitted to local hospitals pose more medical complications than those who are not diabetic and often require more tests and treatments. Severe diabetes often results in serious medical conditions such as liver disease and kidney failure, she said.

According to the UCLA study, 31 percent of the state’s hospitalized patients 35 years or older, the age group that accounts for most hospitalizations, had diabetes. The study estimated that the added cost to hospitals in California was $1.6 billion. Hospital stays for diabetic patients in the state cost an average of $2,200 more than for non-diabetic patients, according to the study.

The study’s authors pointed out that 75 percent of this care is covered by Medicare and Medi-Cal, the state’s Medicaid program. Medi-Cal alone pays $254 million in added costs for diabetic patients.

The Tour de Cure event hosted by the American Diabetes Association of Northeast Ohio has already raised $250,000 for diabetes research

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CUYAHOGA FALLS — The Tour de Cure event hosted by the American Diabetes Association of Northeast Ohio has already raised $250,000 for diabetes research in the region, according to Melissa Sutton, the event manager.

The annual event leads riders through a bike route as long as 100 miles. However, riders could also bike shorter distances.

The Saturday ride kicked off at the Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy on Wyoga Lake Rd. in Cuyahoga Falls.

Participants could also enjoy on-site activities geared towards fun and information about diabetes.

Sutton, who has lived with type one diabetes since she was 9-years-old, says she hopes the ride will combat the stigma the disease faces. “My pancreas stopped working and there’s not a darn thing I can do about it,” Sutton tells Channel 3’s Hilary Golston. “It stops working. So I take it particularly personally when people think it’s a lifestyle disease.”

According to the ADA, 330,000 people have diabetes in Northeast Ohio. “Red riders” or those living with the disease donned red shirts to denote they have diabetes and are participating in the race.

Riders were asked to raise at least $200 to participate, but some raised much more. 11-year-old Gabe Grizwald was able to rake in $2,000. He’s also living with type one diabetes. “I ride for diabetes because it’s just a horrible disease to have and it’s really just changed my life and I think it helps so much when people ride for us and raise money and it really could lead to a cure,” Grizwald tells Golston.

Brian Travalik is Tour de Cure’s red rider ambassador. Decked out in a tutu for flare, he not only lives with diabetes, but represents the so-called “red riders.” Red riders are those who have diabetes and are also participating in Tour de Cure. “It’s a chance to be honored as a hero,” Travalik said. “To see other people with diabetes, it’s a good feeling to be around that comradery of other people that are dealing with that same disease.”

It’s not too late to donate to the cause. You can head over to http://main.diabetes.org/site/TR?fr_id=9375&pg=pfind to give.

 

Study Identifies Possible Protective Blood Factors Against Type 2 Diabetes

BRONX, N.Y., May 3, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in collaboration with Nurses’ Health Study investigators have shown that levels of certain related proteins found in blood are associated with a greatly reduced risk for developing type 2 diabetes up to a decade or more later. The findings, published today in the online edition of Diabetes, could open a new front in the war against diabetes.

These proteins are part of what is called the IGF axis. This axis was named for insulin-like growth factor-1, (IGF-1), so called because it has biological effects similar to those of insulin (the hormone that regulates blood glucose levels) but has a greater effect on cell growth than insulin. The researchers also looked at levels of several proteins known as IGF binding proteins, or IGFBPs, that may have strong effects independent of IGF-1.

Researchers have hypothesized that the IGF axis may influence risk for developing diabetes – an idea supported by laboratory and mouse studies, and a few initial studies in humans. However, the current study is the first large, prospective investigation of several components of the IGF-axis and the risk for developing diabetes, according to co-senior author Howard Strickler, M.D., M.P.H., professor of epidemiology & population health at Einstein.

In the current study, the researchers analyzed levels of IGF-1, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 in blood taken from 742 women in the Nurses’ Health Study who years later developed type 2 diabetes as well as a similar number of women in the study who did not develop diabetes. None of the women had any signs or symptoms of the disease at the time their blood samples were taken. The median time between the taking of blood samples and diabetes onset was nine years.

Each component of the IGF axis (IGF-1 and IGFBP-1, -2, and -3) had a significant independent association with diabetes risk – most notably IGFBP-1 and -2. Compared with women in the bottom 20 percent with respect to their levels of IGFBP-1, having high levels of IGFBP-1 (top 20 percent) was associated with a three-fold reduction in risk for diabetes, while high levels of IGFBP-2 were associated with a more than five-fold reduction in diabetes risk.

“Our data provide important new evidence that circulating IGF-axis proteins may have a role in the development of type 2 diabetes,” said Dr. Strickler.

The findings have potential clinical implications. First of all, IGF-axis proteins could help in stratifying people at risk for diabetes. “For example,” said Dr. Strickler, “we know that obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes. But some overweight individuals don’t develop diabetes, while some thin people do. If our findings are confirmed, they could help doctors more precisely determine who is actually at risk for the disease.”

The proteins may also prove useful as targets for novel therapies to prevent or treat diabetes. But Dr. Strickler cautions that it’s too early to apply these findings to clinical practice. “IGF-axis proteins have other effects, some beneficial and some not,” he notes. “We need to learn more about the connection between the IGF-axis and diabetes before we recommend that people get tested for these substances, and before deciding how we can exploit the IGF-1 axis to help address diabetes.”

The Diabetes paper is titled, “The Insulin-Like Growth Factor Axis and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women.” The first author was Swapnil Rajpathak (who was at Einstein at the time this work was conducted). The other senior author is Frank B. Hu, M.D., Ph.D, of Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Additional contributors include Meian He, M.D., Ph.D., (Harvard and Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China); Qi Sun M.D., Sc.D., (Harvard); Jeannette Beasley, Ph.D., R.D., M.P.H., (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA); Michael Pollak, M.D., (McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada); and Robert Kaplan, Ph.D., Radhika Muzumdar M.D., M.B.B.S., Thomas Rohan, M.D., Ph.D., Mimi Kim, Sci.D., Jeffrey Pessin, Ph.D., and Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., all of Einstein. Co-author Marc Gunter, Ph.D., contributed to the paper while at Einstein.

The study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health. Laboratory testing and data analysis were supported in part by NIDDK 5-R01-DK-080792. The NHS is supported by grants CA-87969, DK-58845, and DK-58785 from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Q.S. was supported by a career development award (K99HL098459) from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

About Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University is one of the nation’s premier centers for research, medical education and clinical investigation. During the 2011-2012 academic year, Einstein is home to 724 M.D. students, 248 Ph.D. students, 117 students in the combined M.D./Ph.D. program, and 368 postdoctoral research fellows. The College of Medicine has 2,522 full time faculty members located on the main campus and at its clinical affiliates. In 2011, Einstein received nearly $170 million in awards from the NIH. This includes the funding of major research centers at Einstein in diabetes, cancer, liver disease, and AIDS. Other areas where the College of Medicine is concentrating its efforts include developmental brain research, neuroscience, cardiac disease, and initiatives to reduce and eliminate ethnic and racial health disparities. Its partnership with Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital and academic medical center for Einstein, advances clinical and translational research to accelerate the pace at which new discoveries become the treatments and therapies that benefit patients. Through its extensive affiliation network involving Montefiore, Jacobi Medical Center – Einstein’s founding hospital, and five other hospital systems in the Bronx, Manhattan, Long Island and Brooklyn, Einstein runs one of the largest post-graduate medical training programs in the United States, offering approximately 155 residency programs to more than 2,200 physicians in training. For more information, please visit www.einstein.yu.edu and follow us on Twitter @EinsteinMed.

SOURCE Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Copyright (C) 2012 PR Newswire. All rights reserved

 

May 1, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

 

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® :

May 1, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

 


April 10, 2012 ~ Diabetes Self Management with Stephanie Smith,Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator.

Stephanie Smith, RD, CDE

Stephanie Smith, RD, CDE: Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator provides outpatient nutrition counseling at Underwood Memorial Hospital in Woodbury, NJ.  She has provided nutrition care to patients at Underwood Memorial Hospital since 2003.

Stephanie graduated with honors from Messiah College with her Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics. She spent time working in community nutrition with the WIC program and moved on to complete her dietetic internship with Sodexho in Philadelphia.

She teaches diabetes self management and nutrition as part of Underwood’s Diabetes program, an American Diabetes Association recognized program.  She also provides nutrition therapy for a variety of nutrition related issues including weight management, gastro intestinal disorders, cardiac, and food allergies.

Listen to Diabetes Living Today® interview:

April 10, 2012 ~ Diabetes Self Management with Stephanie Smith,Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator.


 

March 6, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

 

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

March 6, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® No Sugar Added® Open Forum

February 7, 2012 Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

 

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

February 7, 2012: Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

 


January 17, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

January 17, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

 

 


Take control and avoid diabetes complications

Changing health behaviors is vital for the nearly 26 million Americans with diabetes and the 79 million American adults with pre-diabetes. That’s because improperly managed diabetes can bring serious complications, including heart disease or stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, vision loss or amputation.

However, behavior change is not an easy process. Diabetes affects every area of a person’s life, and it takes a considerable amount of time and effort to manage the disease. Some of the most difficult aspects of the disease are learning to change life-long patterns of eating and activity, and adhering to a new monitoring and medication-taking routine.

Adjustments – small and large – need to be made to an individual’s lifestyle, but where does a person start?

The American Association of Diabetes Educators outlines seven areas of self-care that are essential for living a healthy life with diabetes. Known as the AADE7, they are:

* Healthy eating – learning to make healthy food choices by paying attention to nutritional content and portion sizes.

* Being active – recognizing the importance of physical activity and making a plan to start moving today.

* Monitoring – learning to check and record your blood glucose levels and other numbers important to your diabetes self-care.

* Taking medication – remembering to take your medications as prescribed and understanding how they affect your body and diabetes management.

* Problem solving – gaining skills to identify problems or obstacles to your self-care behaviors and learning how to solve them.

* Reducing risks – understanding the potential complications you are at risk for with diabetes and taking steps to prevent them.

* Healthy coping – developing healthy ways of dealing with difficult times in your diabetes management.

Health care professionals known as diabetes educators can help people with diabetes learn self-care strategies for each of the AADE7, and work with individuals to set and achieve behavior change goals in order to reduce the risk of developing complications.

“It’s just not one of those diseases that you take a pill for in the morning and wait for it to take effect,” says certified diabetes educator, Donna Tomky, president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators.

“Diabetes is unique in that it requires constant supervision of diet and other factors. And while this can be burdensome, the good news is that diabetes education works,” Tomky says. “Once patients understand the complexities involved, they get much better at managing – and improving – their outcomes.”

Medicare and some insurance plans include diabetes self-management training/education as a covered benefit. To find a diabetes educator, visit www.diabeteseducator.org/find or ask your doctor for a referral to a diabetes educator in your area.