The Tour de Cure event hosted by the American Diabetes Association of Northeast Ohio has already raised $250,000 for diabetes research

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CUYAHOGA FALLS — The Tour de Cure event hosted by the American Diabetes Association of Northeast Ohio has already raised $250,000 for diabetes research in the region, according to Melissa Sutton, the event manager.

The annual event leads riders through a bike route as long as 100 miles. However, riders could also bike shorter distances.

The Saturday ride kicked off at the Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy on Wyoga Lake Rd. in Cuyahoga Falls.

Participants could also enjoy on-site activities geared towards fun and information about diabetes.

Sutton, who has lived with type one diabetes since she was 9-years-old, says she hopes the ride will combat the stigma the disease faces. “My pancreas stopped working and there’s not a darn thing I can do about it,” Sutton tells Channel 3’s Hilary Golston. “It stops working. So I take it particularly personally when people think it’s a lifestyle disease.”

According to the ADA, 330,000 people have diabetes in Northeast Ohio. “Red riders” or those living with the disease donned red shirts to denote they have diabetes and are participating in the race.

Riders were asked to raise at least $200 to participate, but some raised much more. 11-year-old Gabe Grizwald was able to rake in $2,000. He’s also living with type one diabetes. “I ride for diabetes because it’s just a horrible disease to have and it’s really just changed my life and I think it helps so much when people ride for us and raise money and it really could lead to a cure,” Grizwald tells Golston.

Brian Travalik is Tour de Cure’s red rider ambassador. Decked out in a tutu for flare, he not only lives with diabetes, but represents the so-called “red riders.” Red riders are those who have diabetes and are also participating in Tour de Cure. “It’s a chance to be honored as a hero,” Travalik said. “To see other people with diabetes, it’s a good feeling to be around that comradery of other people that are dealing with that same disease.”

It’s not too late to donate to the cause. You can head over to http://main.diabetes.org/site/TR?fr_id=9375&pg=pfind to give.

 

Human gut cells turned into insulin producers may treat diabetes

Scientists have converted human gut cells into insulin producers by turning off a single gene in an experiment that suggests a novel way forward in treating diabetes.

Using a miniature model of the human intestine, only a few millimeters in size and made from stem cells, the scientists deactivated a gene in the cells tied to metabolic regulation called FOXO1. Once disabled, the cells began producing insulin.

The method, described Monday in the journal Nature Communications, raises the possibility of replacing insulin- making pancreatic beta cells lost in diabetics by using a drug to retrain patients’ existing cells. While progress has been made in generating beta cells from stem cells, the method hasn’t yet produced ones with all the needed functions, said Domenico Accili, the study’s lead author. Plus, such cells would require transplantation.

“We provided a proof of principle that we can do this in human tissues and are also very excited that there is a single identifiable target to trigger this process,” Accili, professor of medicine at Columbia University’s Naomi Berrie Diabetes Research Center in New York, said in an interview. “This is what the pharmaceutical industry is interested in — make a chemical and do what we did in test tubes to administer to persons with diabetes and teach their gut cells to become beta cells.”

The results build on research two years ago by Accili and his team that first tested the approach in mice, successfully converting gut cells into insulin-making cells. In the human cell experiment, the gut cells started releasing insulin after seven days and only in response to insulin.

Now that Accili and his team have shown it works in human cells, their next step is to develop a drug to test in people. Accili said it’s possible that there could be a compound for clinical trials in a year or two.

Diabetes, which results when the body doesn’t use insulin properly or doesn’t make the hormone, is the seventh-leading cause of death in the U.S. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that helps the body control blood sugar.

Destruction of insulin-making beta cells in the pancreas is the central feature of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. In Type 1 diabetics, the pancreas are destroyed by the immune system and don’t produce insulin. In Type 2, in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly, beta cells become progressively dysfunctional.

One advantage to this experimental approach is that the gastrointestinal tract is partly protected from attack by the immune system, making gut cells less susceptible to destruction, Accili said.

A treatment for diabetes that doesn’t require daily insulin injections would change the treatment landscape for the 29 million diabetics in the U.S. However, it’s likely that any potential drug would first be evaluated for Type 2 diabetes, because of concerns of testing in Type 1 diabetics going without insulin injections, he said.

“The work is a laser-like focus on turning this into a treatment,” Accili said. “We follow 3,000 patients with Type 1 at the Berrie Center alone. That’s our main goal.”

Collaborations with drugmakers are already under way, Accili said, though he declined to name companies.

British drugmaker AstraZeneca Plc helped fund the research, with the National Institutes of Health, the Manpei Suzuki Diabetes Foundation, the Swedish Society for Medical Research, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, the JPB Foundation and the Brehm Coalition.

March 31, 2014 ~ Medtronic Insulin Pump Therapy and CGM with Dr. Francine R. Kaufman

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FRANCINE R. KAUFMAN, M.D.

Chief Medical Officer and Vice President, Global Medical,

Clinical & Health Affairs, Medtronic Diabetes

Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics and Communications at USC

The Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism

Francine Ratner Kaufman, M.D. has had a 30 year distinguished careerin diabetes care, research and advocacy.  In 2009, she stepped down as director of the Comprehensive Childhood Diabetes Center, and head of the Center for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles to become Chief Medical Officer and VP of Global Clinical, Medical and Health affairs at Medtronic Diabetes (Northridge, CA).

 

Dr. Kaufman is also a Distinguished Professor Emerita of Pediatrics and Communications at the Keck School of Medicine and the Annenberg School of Communications of the University of Southern California, and an attending physician at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles.

Dr. Kaufman has published more than 200 peer-reviewed and invited publications. She is the author of more than 30 books or book chapters. In 2008, she edited the 5th edition of the ADA’s the Medical Management of Type 1 Diabetes.  In 2005 her book, Diabesity, was published by Bantam. Diabesity explores the ravages of the obesity and diabetes epidemics as they spread across the globe. Dr. Kaufman was chair of the National Institutes of Health funded Studies to Treat (the TODAY Trial) and Prevent (the HEALTHY Trial) Type 2 Diabetes in Youth (STOPP-T2). She was a principal investigator of TrialNet, a multinational consortium evaluating ways to prevent type 1 diabetes, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  She has received many awards and honors, including the LA City Council for promoting youth physical fitness (2004), from the State of California for her role in banning sodas from Los Angeles Unified School District (2003), and from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), Partners in Care, Starbright Foundation, amongst others.

In 2009, Dr. Kaufman was elected to membership in the Advisory Council of the Diabetes Branch of the NIH. In 2007, she filmed a documentary for Discovery Health on the global diabetes epidemic which was aired around the world on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2007. Also in 2007, Dr. Kaufman was Co-Chair of the Diabetes Work Group for the Department of Health Services of the State of California to recommend diabetes treatment and prevention strategies for the Medicaid population.  In 2005, she was elected Membership in the Institute of Medicine.  Dr. Kaufman was national president of the American Diabetes Association in 2002-03.  She was elected to AOA Medical Honorary Society. She was also president of Shaping America’s Health, chair of the National Diabetes Education Program, and served as chair of the Youth Consultative Section of the International Diabetes Federation.

Listen to the latest broadcast of Diabetes Living Today®:  March 21, 2014 ~ Medtronic Insulin Pump Therapy and CGM with Dr. Francine R. Kaufman

March 13, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar

 

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

March 13, 2012 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~  No Sugar Added® Open Forum

December 28, 2011 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

December 28, 2011 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

December 21, 2011 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

 

Listen to Diabetes Living Today®

December 21, 2011 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

December 13, 2011 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

 

Listen to  Diabetes Living Today®

December 13, 2011 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

December 7, 2011 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

Diabetes Living Today® radio program, provides listeners with education, inspiration and motivation to live healthy and well with diabetes. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does Diabetes Living Today® radio program offers experience, insight, education and tips to manage life with diabetes. Through interviews, including “World Class” Research Scientist, physicians and people living with diabetes, living well tips and questions from the listening audience, host Kitty Castellini and Endocrinologist Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr. are there every step of the way to offer guidance, advice, and most of all, support.

This week Kitty and Dr. Fallon will host their No Sugar Added®  “Open Forum.”

 

Listen to  Diabetes Living Today®

December 7, 2011 ~ Diabetes Living Today® ~ No Sugar Added® Open Forum

November 29, 2011 ~ Dr. Auguste Turnier on Gastroenterology and Diabetes

Dr. Auguste Turnier

Auguste Turnier,MD is a 1986 graduate of the Medical College of Pennsylvania.  He completed his residency in Internal Medicine and fellowship in Gastroenterology at Cooper Hospital University Medical Center.  He also served as Chief Resident in Internal Medicine.  Dr. Turnier and his partner, Melville Ackerman,MD, have practiced general gastroenterology in the South Jersey area for approximately twenty years.  Dr. Turnier is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology and is a member of the American College of Gastroenterology.  He is the immediate past president of the West Jersey Medical Society and has had the honor of being named as a “best doc” in a number of South Jersey publications.

Photo Above:  Kitty Castellini & Dr. Joseph J. Fallon, Jr.

Listen to  Diabetes Living Today®

November 29, 2011 ~ Dr. Auguste Turnier on Gastroenterology and Diabetes

iPro2 Continuous Glucose Monitoring Device Receives FDA Approval

Medtronic, Inc. has announced FDA approval for company’s iPro2, Professional Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) system. The iPro2 has been previously covered on Medgadget . The system comprises a wearable continuous glucose monitoring sensor/data logger and docking station for uploading the recorded data. The technology is tailored for healthcare providers looking to monitor and retrospectively review their patients’ glucose management. The assessments are carried out over a three day period and can help the clinician identify excursions from optimal glucose levels and adjust the patient’s glucose management plan accordingly.

The press release explains the operation of the system:

Setup can be completed in a few minutes and includes inserting a glucose sensor into the patient’s skin, educating the patient, and connecting the iPro2 to the sensor.  The patient then conducts normal daily activities while the iPro2 records and stores as many as 288 glucose readings over each 24-hour period.

iPro2 is adaptable to almost any patient’s lifestyle because of its small, light and water-tight profile, and the patient is not required to interact with the device. After three days of wear, the patient returns iPro2 for upload to new web-based CareLink™ iPro software, which provides a summary of glucose data in easy-to-read reports.

The system has been available in Europe for over a year and it will be great to see the impact of this technology stateside.

Press release…

iPro2 product page…

Flashback: Medtronic Unveils iPro 2 Professional CGM